WWI Trench Warfare Survival Guide Laura Petrasic

Gas Mask

Gas Mask MUA by Nikodem Nijaki is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0

Gas masks were used during WWI to keep out poisonous gases that were intended for the Allies. They were not built well because they did not expect that it would be used in the war. Some of the masks were dipped in a range of chemicals that would "get rid" of gases (Truman).

Steel Helmet

Steel Helmet by unknown is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0

Steel Helmets were used because of increased military and fighting. There were more deadly weapons being used so the helmets were created as a way to protect the soldiers. Different sides during the war used different kinds of steel helmets based on what they wanted to protect (Watanabe).

Vaccines

Vaccination -- Valcartier Camp, Canada (LOC) by The Library of Congress has no known restrictions on publication

There were multiple diseases roaming around during WWI. Because of this, vaccines were introduced to help prevent the disease and kill viruses. They were given sooner than later so that the soldiers could get back on the battlefield fast (Bergen).

Machine Gun

Vickers machine gun crew with gas masks by John Warwick Brooke is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution in the public domain

These machine guns will take down troops that are quickly advancing on you. They would need four to six people to man it and could shoot bullets very far and quick. The truth behind these guns is that they would overheat quickly and needed to be cool down quickly ("Weapons of War - Machine").

Entrenching Tool

Entrenching Tool by Andshel is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license

Entrenching tools were a vital part of staying alive in WWI. They were used to dig down underground to avoid getting killed by the new weaponry. The trenches started out as adequate but then evolved into better things. Most soldiers kept one with them but digging was not its only purpose: it could be used in hand-to-hand combat ("10 Things").

Works Cited

Bergen, Leo Van. “Medicine and Medical Service.” International Encyclopedia of the First World War, encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/medicine_and_medical_service. Accessed 8 Oct. 2014.

Cheshire Regiment Trench Somme by John Warwick Brooke is licensed under Creative Commons

Entrenching Tool by Andshel is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license

Gas Mask MUA by Nikodem Nijaki is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0

Steel Helmet by unknown is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0

“10 Things That Could Have Saved Your Life in the Trenches.” Imperial War Museums, www.iwm.org.uk/history/10-things-that-could-have-saved-your-life-in-the-trenches. Accessed 27 Mar. 2017.

Truman, C. N. “Gas Masks in World War One.” The History Learning Site, 31 Mar. 2015, www.historylearningsite.co.uk/world-war-one/the-western-front-in-world-war-one/gas-masks-in-world-war-one/. Accessed 27 Mar. 2017.

Vaccination -- Valcartier Camp, Canada (LOC) by The Library of Congress has no known restrictions on publication

Vickers machine gun crew with gas masks by John Warwick Brooke is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution in the public domain

Watanabe, Nathan. “Steel Helmet.” International Encyclopedia of the First World War, encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/steel_helmet. Accessed 1 Apr. 2016.

“Weapons of War - Machine Guns.” FirstWorldWar.com, www.firstworldwar.com/weaponry/machineguns.htm. Accessed 27 Mar. 2017.

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