The Curse of the Rapid Industrial Period By: Isaiah McMullen/ hr. 7

Was the Industrial Revolution a Curse?

The first industrial revolution all started with a man named Sam Slater who brought over the designs to build factories from Europe (by memorizing blueprints) and built the first factories in America. The factory owners were very cheap and had only one primary concern, money. Which leads to why the industrial revolution was a curse. It is true that it bosted the economy, it created job opportunities, and it even helped spawn new technologies. This came at a price though because the owners were cheap and promoted poverty amoung workers and a less educated tomorrow by hiring children. The Industrial revolution was a curse because it increased slavery, it promoted child labor, and the factory conditions for the workers were fatal to health.

Cotton Boom

The industrial revolution was a curse because it promoted slavery. The cotton gin was an invention created by Eli Whitney in this industrial period. This invention allowed cotton to be separated 50 times faster than before. This made farmers want more slaves. (Which also dried out the soil by planting crops over and over again, another negative.) "supply of cotton was increased by American Eli Whitney’s invention of the cotton gin." - See W. Trattner. Which ultimately increased slavery due to the demand of cotton all of the world.

Child Labor

Also, the industrial revolution was a curse because of child labor. Children often had to go to work to help the family income. The factories hired these children and they were put to work that you and I couldn't even do. These children were often verbally abused by greedy factory owners, and because of the factory conditions they were not in a healthy environment. Not only were they going through the conditions above, the factories also had long hours which kept them out of school. It was a continuous cycle of poverty for those families because kids couldn't get an education. "In the Eastern and Midwestern United States, child labor became a recognized problem and child labor laws were declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court"- See W. Trattner.

Factory Conditions

In addition, the industrial revolution is a curse because of the profane factory conditions and the effect it had on workers. These factory conditions were often harmful for the workers health and bad for the users health. For example, in the meat factories chemicals were everywhere that were dangerous for the maker and the consumer. As stated by Labor and Industrial law in an article about the Industrial era "workers who are exposed to radioactive materials, poisons, lead, asbestos, and chemicals with potentially harmful effects." And they refer to the employer/ employee relationship to be like "master-servant".

Works Cited

Bibliography: 1. Africa: transportation of African slaves across the Atlantic Ocean. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 18 Sep. 2016. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/178041. Accessed 8 Mar. 20

2. Industrial Workers of the World: New York City demonstration, 1914. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 2 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/148844. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017.

3. "Labor and industrial law." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 2 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/labor-and-industrial-law/275343. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

4. Loom: power loom. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 18 Sep. 2016. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/174906. Accessed 7 Mar. 2017.

5. Slavery: runaway slave reward notice. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 18 Sep. 2016. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/109674. Accessed 7 Mar. 2017.

6. Select citation style "Industrial Revolution." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 7 Mar. 2014. school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/Industrial-Revolution/275053. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017.

7. Textile: textile worker in U.S., 1908. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 2 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/180244. Accessed 7 Mar. 2017.

8. Trattner, See W. "Child Labor." Fact Monster. Columbia University Press., 2012. Web. 1970. <http://www.factmonster.com/encyclopedia/business/child-labor.html>. See W. Trattner, Crusade for the Children (1970); also annual reports of the National Child Labor Committee. The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright © 2012, Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

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