Chapter 11: By joe Sinicropi

The cell cycle or cell-division cycle is the series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication of its DNA (DNA replication) to produce two daughter cells.In the cycle the cell must grow, copy its DNA, and split into two daughter cells. At the end the process it does it again and again therefore is a cycle. There are five stages in the cell cycle of mitosis and they are Interphase, Prophase, Metaphase, Anaphase, and Telophase.

During interphase, the cell grows and makes a copy of its DNA. phase. During G1 phase also called the first gap phase, the cell grows physically larger, copies organelles, and makes the molecular building blocks it will need in later steps. During S phase, the cell synthesizes a complete copy of the DNA in its Nucleus. During G2 phase the cell grows more, makes proteins and organelles, and begins to reorganize its contents in preparation for mitosis.

Each chromosome has replicated during interphase and is therefore composed of two sister chromatids containing identical genetic information. Early during prophase, the first stage of mitosis, the chromosomes become visible with a light microscope as they condenseEach chromosome has replicated during interphase and is therefore composed of two sister chromatids containing identical genetic information. Early during prophase, the first stage of mitosis, the chromosomes become visible with a light microscope as they condense.
Metaphase is the third phase of mitosis, the process that separates duplicated genetic material carried in the nucleus of a parent cell into two identical daughter cells. During metaphase, the cell's chromosomes align themselves in the middle of the cell through a type of cellular "tug of war
Anaphase is the fourth phase of mitosis, the process that separates the duplicated genetic material carried in the nucleus of a parent cell into two identical daughter cells. Before anaphase begins, the replicated chromosomes, called sister chromatids, are aligned at along the equator of the cell on the equatorial plane. The sister chromatids are pairs of identical copies of DNA joined at a point called the centromere.
Telophase is the fifth and final phase of mitosis, the process that separates the duplicated genetic material carried in the nucleus of a parent cell into two identical daughter cells. Telophase begins once the replicated, paired chromosomes have been separated and pulled to opposite sides, or poles, of the cell. During telophase, a nuclear membrane forms around each set of chromosomes to separate the nuclear DNA from the cytoplasm. The chromosomes begin to uncoil, which makes them diffuse and less compact. Along with telophase, the cell undergoes a process called cytokinesis that divides the cytoplasm of the parental cell into two daughter cells.

A telomere is a region of repetitive nucleotide sequences at each end of a chromosome, which protects the end of the chromosome from deterioration or from fusion with neighboring chromosomes.

A cancer cells are cells that join and come between the regular strand and cause the body to break down and the cells to denature.

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