Robert Frank By:Anthony brown

In Zurich, Frank was apprenticed to Hermann Segesser as a commercial photographer. When he went there he trained and became adept at studio portraiture and landscapes, however, Frank did not attend a photography or film school. He was influenced by the environment so he turned to photography for expression as well as a way to escape the pressures of his business-oriented family.

Photo from The Americans

In Roberts early career he scraped and clawed to get where he is now. Frank emigrated to America in 1947; bringing with him his published book 40 fotos, he got a job with Alexey Brodovitch; the art director for Harper's Bazaar and worked for them as a fashion photographer until 1952. Frank took many irregular trips to Europe where he photographed in Paris, Spain, Wales and London, in addition to Central and South America. In 1950 Frank married artist Mary Lockspeiser and participated in the group show curated by Edward Steichen 51 American Photographers at the Museum of Modern Art. for his late career from late 1957 to late 1963 Frank worked with the promotion department at the New York Times as a [freelance] photojournalist. Basically frank was known for the photos he took in the famous photo book "The Americans" as well for his awards In 1963 Frank was Awarded U.S. Citizenship. Frank started making films in 1958, his first film; Pull My Daisy is a semi-improvisational work about bohemian culture and art and is the film Frank is most identified by. His films dealt with life, people and introspection into oneself.

Photo By: Robet Frank, From: "The Americans"

Works Cited

Kim, Eric. "Robert Frank’s “The Americans”: Timeless Lessons Street Photographers Can Learn." Eric Kim. N.p., 26 July 2013. Web. 07 Dec. 2016.Penzer, Mary. "Robert Frank Biography." Robert Frank Biography. N.p., 14 Oct. 2010. Web. 07 Dec. 2016.

Credits:

Created with images by Tony Fischer Photography - "Photograph of Robert Frank"

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