Language Tyler Handin

Tyler Handin

Group: Huy, Marco, Zara

Date: 02/27/17 - 03/05/17

WOK Badge: Language

To what extent is art more of an art than a science?

Journal #1: Language February27

Today we started our work on language as a WOK. We decided to explore to what extent is translation more of an art than a science. There is no definitive way or pattern to translate language so that it makes sense. Each language has its own idioms and formats that make each case different. As a result, you need to use reason in order to make sure it makes sense. We plan to use google translate to show how language is manipulated and changed through translation.

Journal #2: Language March 1

Today we continued to work on our project. We explored an interview with Edith Grossman and got some insight into the specifics of translation. We worked on different translated sentences which we can use at examples to show how scientific or direct translation causes many problems. On the other hand, translation in an artistic sense is less rigid and more flexible which allows the sentences to make sense.

Journal #3: Language March 6

Last week we presented our presentation. Overall, it went very well and I consider it to be a success. We were able to promote our knowledge claim that translation is more of an art than a science through multiple examples and explanations.

Knowledge Questions

Q: How does language shape knowledge?

A: Different languages have different structures and ways of thinking. As a result, a specific language would influence the way in which our knowledge is structured and formed. What we are exposed to through language is changed depending on the language.

Q: Is translation more of an art than a science?

A: Yes, because there is no definitive way or pattern to translate language so that it makes sense. Each language has its own idioms and formats that make each case different. Translation in an artistic sense is less rigid and more flexible which allows the sentences to make sense.

Q: To what extent do you agree with the following statement? "Language does more than simply describe the world in which we live; it actively structures our knowledge of it!"

A: I strongly agree with this statement because language is more than just a way of thinking, it is a way of thinking. Each language is different in that they are structured in specific ways that affect how we perceive our world.

Documentation

Presentation

Extension Proposal

I believe this article is very valuable when it comes to understanding language as a way of knowing. This article provides an in depth analysis with many examples on how using language affects one's way of thinking. The article discusses about how different languages are structured. For example, an aboriginal group called the Kuuk Thaayorre communicates using cardinal direction (north, south, east, west) rather than using direction signals such as right, left, up, down. As a result, you have to be oriented at all times to give or receive directions due to the structure of the language. Thus the way in which they think is altered due to the language. Overall, this article is very intriguing and valuable for someone who wants to understand and learn about language and its relation to how we think.

Supplemental Materials

Translation is more of an art than a science because specific or definitive rules do not apply. Translating between languages is less rigid and it varies from situation to situation. You need to have an understanding of both languages in order to decipher how to go about translating. This is because there are many idioms and ways of thinking in each language which does not always directly translate into another language. For example, in English when you say ‘it’s raining cats and dogs’ you are implying that that it is raining heavily. However, in another language this idiom may not translate the same meaning. It may be taken more literally as in ‘there are cats and dogs falling out of the sky’. As a result, we must go about this in a more artistic fashion to get the same meaning across rather than using a more scientific and direct approach. Using other ways of knowing such as reason helps us to make sure that things do not get lost in translation and the same meaning is promoted.

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To what extent is translation more of an art than a science?

Translation is more of an art than a science because specific or definitive rules do not apply.

For example, in English when you say ‘it’s raining cats and dogs’ you are implying that that it is raining heavily. However, in another language this idiom may not translate the same meaning. It may be taken more literally as in ‘there are actual cats and dogs falling out of the sky’. As a result, we must go about this in a more artistic fashion to get the same meaning across rather than using a more scientific and direct approach.

Taking a more direct and scientific approach we would not translate the same meaning. However, when we use a more artistic approach we keep the same integrity and meaning. Translation is more of an art than a science because of how different each case presents itself. We can not always apply direct translation because of certain idioms and different ways of thinking. As a result, we have to rely on other ways of knowing and our understanding of the languages in order to get the same message across. Our previous knowing is especially important when we want to translate between two languages. If we understand how each language functions we have the ability to find a way to promote the same message.

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