Loading

Hibakusha Appeal Why It’s Relevant Now

2018 US Nuclear Posture Review

The United States maintains an arsenal of about 1,650 strategic nuclear warheads deployed on Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBMs), Submarine-Launched Ballistic Missiles (SLBMs), and Strategic Bombers and some 180 tactical nuclear weapons at bomber bases in five European countries.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) published a major report in October 2017 that estimates the nuclear weapons spending plans President Donald Trump inherited from his predecessor will cost taxpayers $1.2 trillion in inflation-adjusted dollars between fiscal years 2017 and 2046.

This amounts to about 6 percent of all spending on national defense anticipated for that period, as of President Barack Obama’s final budget request to Congress in February 2016. When the effects of inflation are included, the 30-year cost would approach $1.7 trillion, according to a projection by the Arms Control Association.

Estimated Costs for Nuclear Triad Modernization

Investments in nukes

"Early in February 2018, the Republican-controlled Congress passed and President Donald Trump signed new federal budget legislation that increased U.S. military spending by $165 billion over the next two years. Remarkably, though, a Gallup public opinion poll, conducted only days before, found that only 33 percent of Americans favored increasing U.S. military spending, while 65 percent opposed it, either backing reductions (34 percent) or maintenance of the status quo (31 percent)." Lawrence Wittner IPPNW

Who's Investing?

329 financial institutions from around the world invested 525 billion USD into 20 companies involved in the production, maintenance and modernization of nuclear weapons since January 2014.

Important progress being made right here, in Cambridge!

In 2016 the Cambridge City Council passed a resolution to divest City-managed pension funds from companies that produce nuclear weapons, or invest in their production. There was a forum held in January 2018 which addressed the issues confronting city government as it works to follow through on the resolution. The forum was sponsored by the Cambridge Peace Commission; Massachusetts Peace Action; Campaign for Peace, Disarmament and Common Security; Institute for People’s Engagement; and Future of Life Institute Program Committee: Councilor Dennis Carlone (Chair); State Rep. Mike Connolly; Shelagh Foreman (Peace Action Board Chair); Prof. Jonathan King. John Ratliff (Cambridge Peace Commission)

India and Pakistan’s Nuclear Weapons

Recent news:

Both India and Pakistan launched airstrikes over the Line of Control -- the de facto border that separates the two countries in disputed Kashmir -- in the first such incursion since 1971.

An Indian jet was shot down in the dogfight and its pilot held in Pakistan custody for several days before Islamabad released him back to New Delhi on Friday.

The immediate trigger for the latest confrontation was a suicide car bomb attack on February 14 in Indian-controlled Kashmir, which killed 40 Indian paramilitary soldiers.

India blamed the terrorist group Jaish-e-Mohammed for the attack, the deadliest on security forces since the beginning of the insurgency in the late 1980s.

India: 130-140 Nuclear Weapons

Situation: India has a policy of retaliation only- will respond with punitive retaliation should deterrence fail

Pakistan: 140-145 Nuclear Weapons

Problem: National Command Authority is dominated by military, limited oversight by civilians.

Source: Federation of American Scientists

You may think that’s a small amount of nuclear weapons, but let’s think about the consequences of a limited nuclear war!!

  1. Even in a limited proxy war with less than 100 nuclear weapons, the war would disrupt the global climate and agriculture production
  2. Smoke in the atmosphere would heat the upper atmosphere, no more ozone increased ultraviolet radiation reaching the ground
  3. Famine

What Happens to Our Food Supply

  1. More than 2 billion world wide would be threatened
  2. More than a billion additional people would face malnourishment
  3. Chinese winter wheat production would fall 50% in the first year, and average for the next decade would be 31% below the baseline
  4. Corn production would decline by an average of 10%, most severe decline (20%) in year 5
  5. Soybean would decline by 7% with most severe loss more than 20% in year 5
  6. Decline in the middle season rice production: first 4 years: rice production decline by 21 percent, over the next 6 years, the decline would average 10%
  7. Global Commodity Prices would rise

Source: “Nuclear Famine” by the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War

Doomsday Clock

The symbolic device was created by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists in 1947. It was founded at the University of Chicago in 1945 by a group of scientists who helped develop the first atomic weapons.

Growing concerns about a possible nuclear war and other global threats have pushed forward the symbolic Doomsday Clock by 30 seconds - to just two minutes before midnight.

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (BAS) said it had acted because the world was becoming "more dangerous".

The clock, created by the journal in 1947, is a metaphor for how close mankind is to destroying the Earth.

It is now the closest to the apocalypse it has been since 1953.

That was the year when the US and the Soviet Union tested hydrogen bombs.

Last year, the clock was moved forward by 30 seconds. Today, the group includes physicists and environmental scientists from around the world, who decide whether to adjust the clock in consultation with the group's Board of Sponsors - which includes Nobel laureates.

What was behind the decision?

Announcing the move in Washington DC on Thursday, the BAS said the decision "wasn't easy" and said it was not based on a single factor.

However, BAS President and CEO Rachel Bronson said that "in this year's discussions, nuclear issues took centre stage once again".

  1. US withdrawal of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (Iran Nuclear Deal)
  2. US intention to withdraw from the INF Treaty, which bans missiles of intermediate range.
  3. The "weakening of institutions" around the world in dealing with major global threats - including climate change - was another major concern, the scientists said.
  4. They also mentioned US President Donald Trump's "unpredictability", pointing to his often controversial tweets and statements.

How does the threat compare to previous years?

When it was created in 1947, the clock's hand stood at seven minutes to midnight. Since then it has changed more than 20 times, ranging from two minutes to midnight to 17 minutes before midnight in 1991.

But during the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis - considered by many analysts to be the closest the Cold War face-off between the US and the USSR came to escalating into a nuclear war - the Doomsday Clock stood still at seven minutes to midnight.

The BAS says: "The answers to this seeming anomaly are that the Doomsday Clock captures trends and takes into account the capacity of leaders and societies to respond to crises with reasoned actions to prevent nuclear holocaust.

"The Cuban Missile Crisis, for all its potential and ultimate destruction, only lasted a few weeks; however, the lessons were quickly apparent when the United States and the Soviet Union installed the first hotline between the two capitals to improve communications, and, of course, negotiated the 1963 test ban treaty, ending all atmospheric nuclear testing."

In fact, the Doomsday Clock was moved back to 12 minutes to midnight in 1963.

State of Affairs in Japan

Japan refuses to support immediate nuclear disarmament

Favors slow incremental steps within the Conference on Disarmament, a consensus based forum, which includes India, Pakistan, Israel, and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea)

Boycotted the TPNW negotiations

Foreign Minister’s Statement after the Adoption of the TPNW:

“We consider that the treaty that was adopted this time differs from our view and approach, which is aimed at "a world free of nuclear weapons." Therefore, given the increasingly serious confrontation between nuclear-weapon states and non-nuclear-weapon states, we think the most important issue is for both sides to rebuild their relationship of trust. We want to take the lead in taking concrete and practical measures based on such thinking.”

BUT!! Citizens are rising up and saying no to nukes!

Japan confederation of A and H bombs survivors

How You Can Help Ban Nukes

Hibakusha Appeal

Join the Hibakusha Appeal: I vote with the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki for a world free of nuclear weapons

We, the Hibakusha, call on all State Governments to conclude a treaty to ban and eliminate nuclear weapons. The average age of the Hibakusha now exceeds 80. It is our strong desire to achieve a nuclear-weapon-free world in our lifetime so that succeeding generations of people will not see hell on earth every again.
You, your families and relatives, or any other people should not be made Hibakusha again. We believe that your signatures appended to this appeal will add up to the voices of hundreds of millions of people around the world and move international politics. They will finally save the future of our blue planet and all life on it. We earnestly appeal to you to append your signature to this petition.
Presenting over 8,000,000 signatures to the United Nations in September 2018

“So that the people from future generations will not have to experience hell on earth, we want to realize a world free of nuclear weapons while we are still alive.”

Join your voice with those of the Hibakusha to say “Never Again.”

Sign the petition for a new treaty to ban nuclear weapons below.

Hibakusha Earnestly Desire Elimination of Nuclear Weapons

At present, humanity stands at the crossroads of whether to save our blue planet with all living things on it as it is or to go along the road of self-destruction.

The two atomic bombs dropped on August 6th and 9th 1945 by the US forces totally destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki in an instant and killed and wounded hundreds of thousands of people without discrimination. With corpses charred black, bodies with their skins peeled off and with lines of people tottering in silence, a hell on earth emerged. Those who narrowly survived soon collapsed one after another. For more than 70 years since then, we have struggled to live on, afflicted by the delayed effects and by anxiety about the possible effects of radiation on our children and grandchildren. Never again do we want such tragedies to be repeated.

After 11 years of silence following the A-bomb suffering, Hibakusha assembled in Nagasaki in August 1956 and founded Nihon Hidankyo, the Japan Confederation of A-and H-bomb Sufferers Organizations. There we pledged that we would work to "save humanity from its crisis through the lessons learned from our experiences, while at the same time saving ourselves".

Since then we have continued appealing to the world that "there should never be another Hibakusha." This is the cry of our soul. Wars and conflicts are still going on in the world, and many lives of innocent people are lost. Nuclear weapons are being used to threaten others. There are also moves to develop new nuclear weapons. The destructive power of existing nuclear weapons, which number well over 10 thousand, amounts to that of tens of thousands of Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs combined. Nuclear weapons are the "weapons of the devil". They could wipe out the human race and all other creatures. They could destroy the environment and turn the globe into a dead planet.

Human beings have prohibited the use, development, production, and possession of biological and chemical weapons by treaties and protocols. Why do we hesitate to prohibit nuclear weapons, which are far more destructive than these weapons?

We, the Hibakusha, call on all State Governments to conclude a treaty to ban and eliminate nuclear weapons. The average age of the Hibakusha now exceeds 80. It is our strong ' desire to achieve a nuclear-weapon-free world in our lifetime so that succeeding generations of people will not see hell on earth ever again.

You, your families and relatives, or any other people should not be made Hibakusha again. We believe that your signatures appended to this appeal will add up to the voices of hundreds of millions of people around the world and move international politics. They will finally save the future of our blue planet and all life on it. We earnestly appeal to you to append your signature to this petition.

April 2016

Initial Proposers of the Appeal:

Sunao Tsuboi, Sumiteru Taniguchi and Mikiso Iwasa, Co-Chairpersons, Hidankyo (Japan Confederation of A-and H-Bomb Sufferers Organizations)

Terumi Tanaka, Secretary General, Hidankyo

Kwak Kwi Hoon, Honorary Chairman, Korean Association of Atomic Bomb Victims

Tsukasa Mukai, President, US Association of Atomic Bomb Victims

Takashi Morita, President, Associacao Hibakusha Brasil Pela Paz

Setsuko Thurlow, Hibakusha of Hiroshima, Toronto,Canada

Yasuaki Yamashita, Hibakusha of Nagasaki, Mexico City, Mexico

International Signature Campaign in Support of the Appeal of the Hibakusha for the Elimination of Nuclear Weapons

Earnestly desiring the elimination of nuclear weapons without delay, we, the Hibakusha, call on all State Governments to conclude a treaty to ban and eliminate nuclear weapons.

I, the undersigned, hereby support the Appeal of the Hibakusha.

NOTE: After the launch of the International Signature Campaign in April 2016, the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons was adopted on July 7, 2017. This Campaign now calls on all State Governments to join the Treaty and achieve the total elimination of nuclear weapons.

Created By
PEAC Institute
Appreciate

Credits:

Created with images by Christoph Deinet - Cover photo "Mount Aspiring" All other photos by Rebecca Irby

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a copyright violation, please follow the DMCA section in the Terms of Use.