Women in STEM Text Set Makinzie Alamo

Rationale: Women of Power Text Set could be used for 3rd grade. The overall main topic of this text set is about women of power and STEM. I have to fiction books that are about engineer and scientist also about being a doctor. It's important to study this topic because little girls need to know that they can do anything they put their mind too. Also, boys need to know to not second guess a girl because they can be really smart and challenge them. “When teachers give students some encouragement, it can be a powerful thing," (NEA Today)

Nonfiction

Hidden Figures

Shetterfly, M. L. (2016). Hidden Figures Young Readers' Edition. HarperCollins.

Summary: Hidden Figures Young Readers' Edition is about the women mathematicians that helped in the Space Race. This book highlights four African-American women who lived in some of the hardest time periods in the US life time. Without these women, we would have not completed the Space Race and NASA would not be where it is at. This book is for higher level reader or could be used for read aloud.

  • ISBN: 0062662376
  • Pages: 240
  • KCCR ELA Standard: RL.3.3 – Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
  • 5 Reading First: Comprehension
  • 6 Areas of Language Arts: Reading and listening
  • How does this support: Hidden Figures supports this text set because it is about three women who were behind hide the scene scientist but without them we would have not completed our mission in the space race. This book and the movie are both powerful statements that women can be in STEM. As a teacher, I would use this book higher students or read aloud. Then the students can describe the characters throughout the book and how the sequence of books affect the characters.
Amelia and Eleanor Go For a Ride

Ryan, Pam Muñoz., and Brian Selznick. Amelia And Eleanor Go For A Ride. Scholastic Press, 1999. Print.

Summary: Amelia and Eleanor Go For a Ride is about Amelia Earhart and Eleanor Roosevelt and their night time flight. Amelia and Eleanor left a White House dinner for a night time flight. This book shows that back in the day that women were thought of they could not drive or fly. Well Eleanor and Amelia both had different mindsets about these topics. Amelia and Eleanor both have close relationship to Kansas. A teacher can use this book in Kansas to make personal connection to students that these two fearless leaders made history together in one night.

  • ISBN: 059096075X
  • Pages: 40
  • KCCR ELA Standard: RI.3.3 – Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.
  • 5 Reading First: Vocabulary
  • 6 Areas of Language Arts: Reading and visually
  • How this book support: Amelia and Eleanor Go for Ride supports this text set because it's about two women who had a huge impact on our nation. Amelia was a pioneer in women in STEM. She was the first female pilot. This book also makes a personal connection to Kansas. The students can describe the relationship of Amelia and Eleanor and the historical events they had.
Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World

Ignotofsky, Rachel. Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World. New York: Ten Speed Press, 2016. Print.

Summary: Women in Science is about 50 female scientist that made a huge impact on our lives today. This book talks about in depth about these scientist and what they did. Women in Science is a very colorful and eye grabbing book that will catch any student eye. You can find information about Elizabeth Blackwell, Marie Curie, etc. This book can be used to find facts for research project.

  • ISBN: 1607749769
  • Pages: 128
  • KCCR ELA Standard: RI.3.3 – Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.
  • 5 Reading First: Comprehension
  • 6 Areas of Language Arts: Writing and Speaking
  • How this book supports: Women in Science supports this text because it shows 50 different pioneers in science. Science is key to STEM. Showing students all these fearless women might inspire one of them to go into STEM. Students can describe different scientific ideas and concept by writing and speaking.

Fiction

Rosie Revere Engineer

Beaty, A., & Roberts, D. (2015). Rosie Revere, Engineer. New York: Abrams.

Summary: Rosie Revere, Engineer is about a girl who is constantly inventing new contraptions. In fear of failure, Rosie will not show anyone what she invented. Rosie Aunt Rose helps Rosie to face her fear of failing by encouraging her to show and give her inventions a chance. This book will show students that they need face fear of failure straight on and be proud of what you have invented.

  • ISBN: 1419708457
  • Pages: 32
  • KCCR ELA Standard: RL.3.3 – Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
  • 5 Reading First: Vocabulary
  • 6 Areas of Language Arts: Visually for critical thinking also Reading
  • How this supports: Rosie Revere, Engineer supports this text set because it's about a little girl who is interested in engineer and creating her own inventions.
Ada Twist Scientist

Beaty, A., & Roberts, D. (2016). Ada Twist, Scientist. New York: Abrams.

Summary: Ada Twist, Scientist is about a little girl who's mind is always going. Ada is curious about things all around her. Throughout the book, Ada is on a fact finding mission. The scientist in Ada wants to explore and discovery new items around her. An scientist mind is constantly thinking of new ideas and news things to explore. This book will make the students want to explore more.

  • ISBN: 1419721372
  • Pages: 32
  • KCCR ELA Standard: RL.3.3 – Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
  • 5 Reading First: Vocabulary
  • 6 Areas of Language Arts: Writing and Viewing
  • How this books support: Ada Twist, Scientist supports this text set because it shows a girl loving science. Most girls lose interest in science and math starting in elementary school. Showing that girls truly can do a lot with these area will make them like it more.
Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women

Thimmesh, C., & Sweet, M. (2002). Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women. Houghton Mifflin.

Summary: Girls Think of Everything is about all these women who invented things that we use in our every day life. In the book, it gives us a timeline of events that items were invented and by who. Throughout the book, they talk about key inventions and how they came about. They talk about chocolate chip cookies, fire escape, windshield wiper, etc. This book allows students to see how inventing were made and by who.

  • ISBN: 0618195637
  • Pages: 64
  • KCCR ELA Standard: RL.3.3 – Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.
  • 5 Reading First: Comprehension
  • 6 Areas of Language Arts: Writing and Speaking
  • How this books support: Girls Think of Everything supports this text set because it shows various inventions that women have created. This would be an eye opening moment for students because it will show them that women did create some key inventions that we use in a daily life.

Visual/Illustrate

Beard, M. (2017, February 17). Displacement Activity – The TLS. Retrieved April 14, 2017, from http://www.the-tls.co.uk/displacement-activity/

  • KCCR ELA Standard: L.2.1 – Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • 5 Reading First: Comprehension
  • 6 Areas of Language Arts: Visually Representing
  • How does this support: This visual is historical image of women in STEM. Back when this image came out, it was not called STEM. A teacher can ask who is these, what was going on that caused them to publish this, and why did they publish this image? Along with multiple books in this text set, it shows the historical side of STEM.

Lantero, A., & Wilkins, C. (2016, March 1). Celebrating the History of Women in STEM. Retrieved April 13, 2017, from https://www.energy.gov/articles/celebrating-history-women-stem

  • KCCR ELA Standard: RI.2.3 – Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text.
  • 5 Reading First: Vocabulary and Comprehension
  • 6 Areas of Language Arts: Visually Representing and Writing
  • How this supports: This infographic is released just a few weeks ago. These four women had some type of impact on the STEM fields. Students can make connection of historical events that these women above did. This infographic is helpful to show and finding the years past can make an impact on girls because it shows if they can do it that your students can do it.

Brown, S. (2015, September 23). We Need Women in STEM Careers. Retrieved April 14, 2017, from http://discover.monsanto.com/posts/stem-careers-women/

  • KCCR ELA Standard: RL.2.7 – Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.
  • 5 Reading First: Comprehension
  • 6 Areas of Language Arts: Viewing, Writing, and Listening
  • How this support: This infographic shows the statistics of women in STEM. The students can gather information from this illustration and research about it. The students can have a group discussion on why women are not in STEM and why they might not be paid as much. This is a higher level of discussion and information but it will show young girls that are they are needed in this field.

Movie

Hidden Figures (2016). (2016, December 25). Retrieved April 14, 2017, from http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4846340/

  • KCCR ELA Standard: RL.2.3 – Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.
  • 5 Reading First: Comprehension
  • One of the Six of Language Arts: Viewing, Visually Representing, Listening, and Writing
  • How this supports: Hidden Figures is the most current and popular movie about women in STEM. It does not just show women in STEM but it shows the diversity of women in the field. This movie shows how these three women were critical for the space race. Students can describe how the characters respond in the movie when they are challenged. The students will be viewing, listening, and can write about it afterwards.

Additional Resources

  • Books for Smart, Confident, and Courageous Girls. (2017). Retrieved April 13, 2017, from http://www.amightygirl.com/books
  • At this resource, they have tons of books and resources you can use in the classroom. This is where I found all of my books and alternative.
  1. 6 Inspiring Non-Fiction Reads about Women in Science. (2017, March 17). Retrieved April 13, 2017, from https://blog.booktopia.com.au/2017/03/17/6-inspiring-non-fiction-reads-women-science/
  2. This source has 6 non-fiction reads about women in science that students can read.
  • Lantero, A., & Wilkins, C. (2016, March 1). Celebrating the History of Women in STEM. Retrieved April 13, 2017, from https://www.energy.gov/articles/celebrating-history-women-stem
  • Every year, this website releases new infographic of women in STEM.
  1. Hawkins, B. (2015, October 15). Bias and Stereotypes Sideline Girls in STEM. Retrieved April 13, 2017, from http://neatoday.org/2015/10/15/bias-and-stereotypes-sideline-girls-in-stem/
  2. This is an article about girls in STEM and how there is bias and stereotypes. It's truly a good read and I learned a lot from it.

Credits:

Created with images by xegxef - "light lamp electricity"

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.