The Globe Theatre Kaylee licona period 3

The Globe theater was built with a lot of precision. It also had different seating's with different meanings. In addition, The Globe theater revolved a lot around Shakespeare and actors.

Construction of the globe theater

Construction-1

Source:

Seidel, Michael. "Globe Theatre." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 17 Nov. 2016.

Direct Quote:

"The Globe was round or polygonal on the outside and probably round on the inside. The theater may have held as many as 3,000 spectators. Its stage occupied the open-air space, with a pit in front for standing viewers. The stage was surrounded by several levels of seating," (Seidel).

Paraphrase:

During this time the Globe was built with an open-air space that held many different levels of seating to show many different meanings to the seating's. The significance of the way the Globe was built was it held as many as 3,000 spectators which was a significant amount for the number of spectators

Construction-2

Source:

Seidel, Michael. "Globe Theatre." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 17 Nov. 2016.

Direct Quote:

"In 1613, the Globe burned down. It was rebuilt on the same foundation and reopened in 1614. The Globe was shut down in 1642 and torn down in 1644. A reconstruction of the theater was completed 200 yards (183 meters) from the original site in 1996, and it officially opened in 1997," (Seidel).

Paraphrase:

In the year 1613 the Globe burned down, with this it was rebuilt and reopened a year later in 1614. Later on in 1642 it was shut down and torn down but rebuilt. This was significant since the building in this time was different to that of others in that time era.

Construction-3

Source:

Gurr, Andrew. <i>Playgoing in Shakespeare's London</i>. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987.

Direct Quote:

"The true dimensions of the Globe are not known since no architectural plans exist.The Globe was 20-sided and nearly cylindrical, with a diameter of around 105 feet. A large rectangular stage in the center of its amphitheater measured 43 by 23 feet. Three overhanging tiered galleries seated the audience. The top gallery had a thatched roof, but the rest of the theater was open to the elements," (Gurr).

Paraphrase:

Even though the Globe was so famous no actual architectural plans exist. The Globe was large in size

Seating of the Globe theater

Seating-1

Source:

Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare's Day." In Baker, William, and Kenneth Womack, eds. <i>The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare</i>. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2012. <i>Bloom's Literature</i>, Facts On

Direct Quote:

" The theater could hold approximately 2,500–3,000 spectators," (Medici).

Paraphrase:

Within this time era holding up to 2,500-3,000 spectators was a major concept or idea. Let alone being able to fill that many seats on a daily basis showed the significance of this theater.

Seating-2

Source:

Lander, Jesse M. "Shakespeare, William." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 4 Dec. 2016.

Direct Quote:

"The stage of a public theater was a large platform that projected into the pit. This arrangement allowed the audience to watch from the front and sides. The performers, nearly surrounded by spectators, thus had close contact with most of their audience," (Lander).

Paraphrase:

The stage of public theaters were built for close contact with audience within the pit section. The closeness with the audience help them feel a part of the play. Those seats were also for the working class that couldn't afford seats of higher value the pit seats cost as much as a penny.

Seating-3

Source:

---. "Shakespeare And His Theater: A Perfect Match." Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 778-80.

Direct Quote:

"The groundlings, those eight hundred or more people who stood shoulder to shoulder around the stage for the price of a penny, loved a good show," (Anderson).

Paraphrase:

This seating was so close to the stage the audience felt like they were in the performance. These were the lowest of seats for those who couldn't afford higher level seats. These seats were also open to the elements and if it were to rain you weren't allowed umbrellas.

Shakespeare-1

Source:

Anderson, Robert. "William Shakespeare's Life: A Genius From Stratford." Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 776-77.

Direct Quote:

"Shakespeare was the ultimate professional writer. He had a theater that needed plays, actors who needed parts, and a family that needed to be fed," (Anderson).

Paraphrase:

Shakespeare had everything he needed to be successful. He just needed the audience to fill his desire to be successful. The most significant part to this was he never had a formal education like other successful people but he still made it.

Shakespeare-2

Source:

Lander, Jesse M. "Shakespeare, William." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 4 Dec. 2016.

Direct Quote:

"Shakespeare was one of six shareholders who signed the lease for the new site in 1599. He thus became part of the first group of actor-sharers to also be theater owners. Although this arrangement meant considerable financial risk, it also promised to be profitable if the new theater was a success. The Globe proved to be a wise investment, and it remained a home to Shakespeare’s acting company until the religious reformers known as Puritans closed the theaters in 1642, during the English Civil War," (Lander)

Paraphrase:

When the Globe was rebuilt outside of the city Shakespeare was one of the six shareholders with his name on the lease for the new site. Even though it could have been a major financial loss he took the leap of faith and signed. The Globe was a wise investment helping grow Shakespeare's popularity.

Shakespeare-3

Source:

Baker, William. "Shakespeare, William." In Baker, William, and Kenneth Womack, eds. <i>The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare</i>. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2012. <i>Bloom's Literature</i>, Facts On File, Inc.

Direct Quote:

"At some point after his marriage, and probably after the birth of his children, Shakespeare must have made his way to London and joined the theatrical world there. Little is known for certain about how this happened, but it is thought that Shakespeare might have first worked as a minor actor in one of London's theater companies before making his name as a playwright," (Baker).

Paraphrase:

Shakespeare didn't start his career in theater until after the birth of his children. Shakespeare also didn't originally start off as a playwright he originally started off as a minor actor. From there he became a playwright and started producing his own plays.

Shakespeare-4

Source:

Lander, Jesse M. "Shakespeare, William." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 4 Dec. 2016.

Direct Quote:

"As was customary, Shakespeare’s company, the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, rented performance space. For most of the 1590’s, the Lord Chamberlain’s Men performed in a building called The Theatre," (Lander).

Paraphrase:

The theater was the start to Shakespeare's up-rise and the most common place for Shakespeare's plays to be performed. This theater gave a huge contribution to Shakespeare and his growing popularity.

Works Cited

Anderson, Robert. “Shakespeare And His Theater: A Perfect Match.” Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 778-80.

---. “William Shakespeare’s Life: A Genius From Stratford.” Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 776-77.

Baker, William. “Shakespeare, William.” In Baker, William, and Kenneth Womack, eds. The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2012. Bloom’s Literature, Facts On File, Inc.

Gurr, Andrew. Playgoing in Shakespeare’s London. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987.

Lander, Jesse M. “Shakespeare, William.” World Book Advanced. World Book, 2016. Web. 4 Dec. 2016.

Medici, Anthony G. “Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day.” In Baker, William, and Kenneth Womack, eds. The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2012. Bloom’s Literature, Facts On

Seidel, Michael. “Globe Theatre.” World Book Advanced. World Book, 2016. Web. 17 Nov. 2016.

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Created with images by JustABoy - "The Globe Theatre" • JustABoy - "The Globe Theatre(15)" • veritatem - "interior of the globe theatre" • jig o'dance - "The Globe Theatre, London" • JustABoy - "The Globe Theatre(2)" • lostajy - "The Globe Theatre (Waiting for the Start)" • steveczajka - "William Shakespeare" • tonynetone - "William Shakespeare"

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