The Manga Carta The Great Charter

Magna Carta, meaning ‘The Great Charter’, is one of the most famous documents in the world. Originally issued by King John of England (r.1199-1216) as a practical solution to the political crisis he faced in 1215, Magna Carta established for the first time the principle that everybody, including the king, was subject to the law. Although nearly a third of the text was deleted or substantially rewritten within ten years, and almost all the clauses have been repealed in modern times, Magna Carta remains a cornerstone of the British constitution. Most of the 63 clauses granted by King John dealt with specific grievances relating to his rule. However, buried within them were a number of fundamental values that both challenged the autocracy of the king and proved highly adaptable in future centuries. Most famously, the 39th clause gave all ‘free men’ the right to justice and a fair trial. Some of Magna Carta’s core principles are echoed in the United States Bill of Rights (1791) and in many other constitutional documents around the world, as well as in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) and the European Convention on Human Rights (1950).

Magna Carta

The Magna Carta led to the creation of the Great Council. This was a place for Nobles to advise the king. Over the years it evolved to incorporate all different types of citizens of England. It would later become Parliament, and would help shape modern governments.

Credits:

Created with images by Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com - "King John Posts the Magna Carta to His Facebook Wall, from an 1864 woodcut" • adamfarnsworth - "The Magna Carta" • variationblogr - "Magna_Carta" • Martin Pettitt - "Lincoln 15-10-2011"

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