Type 1 Diabetes Darby craig & Ashley roman

Type 1 diabetes is caused by damage to the pancreas, making it very difficult for people with type 1 diabetes to produce their own insulin. Insulin is a hormone released by the pancreas that signals cells to open and accept incoming glucose.

For T1D, a diet is very important to survival. One should cut back on saturated fats that you find in high-fat meat and dairy products. Also, getting enough fiber is very important which is found in beans, whole grain, fruits and vegetables. When making a plate, keep in mind that 1/4 should be starch, 1/4 protein, and 1/2 non-starchy vegetables. The daily ratio of grams is 55:20:25 (carbs:fats:protein). The total consumption of carbohydrates is 45-60 grams per meal.

For a T1D, treatment is fairly simple. One must check their blood sugar often, using a Blood Glucose Meter. Talk with your personal doctor to determine how many times you need to check it, even though it usually after every meal. The healthy number it should be before a meal is 80-130 mg/dl. After around 2 hours, ones blood sugar should be below 180. Another treatment option is the A1C. This is a test preformed by your personal doctor, every three months, to determine how well one is keeping up with their blood sugar. The normal level for A1C is between 5.7 and 6.4.

Exercise is a very important activity for a diabetic. With a proper diet and exercise, a T1D can live a healthy and normal lifestyle. When exercising, one should check their blood sugar before and after. Be prepared with a sugary snack in case ones blood sugar drops to low. On average, working out 60 minutes a day will help maintain a healthy weight. Becoming overweight can cause many problems for a diabetic because too much weight gain can make it hard for insulin to work correctly, causing the need of insulin to rise and more difficultly controlling blood sugar. High blood sugar can cause heart disease, strokes, and kidney disease.

"Life is not over because you have diabetes. Make the most of what you have, be grateful."-Dale Evans

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/weight-control/health_risks_being_overweight/Pages/health-risks-being-overweight.aspx#b

http://www.jdrf.org/about/fact-sheets/type-1-diabetes-facts/

http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/weight-diabetes.html#

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