Nature & The Good Life Austin gordon

Nature on Display

Just because something is smaller, does not mean it is less significant.

As someone who enjoys scuba diving, you could imagine how the 12x life-size underwater hall excited me. This exhibit's message, in my eyes, was that just because something is smaller, does not mean it is less significant. As such, it would be hard to communicate such a message through a different medium.

Nature & Ethics

we have created a long lasting impact that will continue to reverberate for thousands of years.
It seems recent generations have been more trashy than classy.

Many museums like to remind its visitors of their own obligation to help heal the world around them, and this museum was no exception. From its hall of extinction to its more subtle hints that humans are killing the environment, the Florida Museum of Natural History made me aware of the ethical dilemmas our beautiful land faces because of economic misuse. This exhibit in particular allowed its visitors to see the history of shell beds, complete with deposits of human waste starting around 150 years ago. This taught me that even though our generation's time has been short, we have created a long lasting impact that will continue to reverberate for thousands of years. In this way, humans must take a stand against this unethical misuse of land to ensure nature will remain a key component in having a Good Life.

Nature's Link to the Past

Learning Native American cultures teach present day humans how to properly give and take from the land we use in our daily lives.

Since I enjoy camping so much, I can easily see the link between the human spirit and nature. Being in the outdoors surrounded by wildlife often alleviates my stress and ameliorates my mood overall. I think the museum did a great job at assisting its visitors in stepping out of their everyday lives and into the bigger picture. It takes us back in time and shows us that the good life can be achieved without the gross overuse and abuse of our Earth. This portal in time makes me appreciate the millions of different ways people interpret a good life, which adds to my idea that this exact notion is what makes the universe so majestic: every life form is free to interpret each experience in a unique way, just as these Indians believed the good life was honoring their gods through hunting, fishing, and celebrating.

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