Intuition Shivani Bathija

Journals!

Journal #1

Shivani Bathija

Mack, Divya, Ansar

Badge Leader: Mack

WOK Badge: Intuition

On the third night of our trip to London, my group members and I met in our hotel lobby and our whole meeting was basically attempting to define what intuition actually is. After looking into the textbook and reading a little of what was assigned to us, Blink, we decided that intuition was reflective thought not based on subconscious or conscious thinking, based on experience and confidence. Some examples we had of intuition so far on our trip was trying to familiarize ourselves with the works of the city. We found that the girl in our group who grew up in New York was more confident roaming the streets of London, as New York and London are similar in many aspects. Due to experience with the city she grew up with, she was more intuitive in this situation.

Journal #2

Shivani Bathija

Mack, Divya, Ansar

Badge Leader: Mack

WOK Badge: Intuition

The next night, we met again and this time tried to come up with a way to show that we know what intuition is when it came to Theory of Knowledge. I looked in the book, Blink, and found the example in the introduction about gamblers, and how people who gamble more are more prone to catch on to patterns quicker than those who do not gamble. We found this relevant to the question we had picked for our project, "Why are some people more intuitive than others?". We didn't know the presentation was just a paragraph at this point, so we thought of maybe doing an experiment that mimicked that, but then realized that our trip is so full that we did not have enough time to conduct that experiment. However, I saw that our intuition on the trip was being used as the more we did something, the more our instincts kicked in, and therefore our intuition kicked in. For instance, when we were traveling at the underground, on the first day we were hectic and nervous and hesitated, but today we were ready to come on and off like a pro, and were not scared to be closer to the train as it barged in.

Elective Reading

For my elective reading, I watched the video prescribed called "Understanding unconscious bias". It explains how we use our unconscious bias based on intuition, and how our intuition is based off cultural surroundings and experience. The video explains that our unconscious bias is usually wrong, and gives examples that prove that, and explains that relying on unconscious bias as a platform for decision making can be dangerous because of this. I thought that watching this video was a good resource due to the fact that it explained stuff in context of the video itself. For example, the video explained while we don't outright think or say that we prefer one group over another, we do technically believe that due to unconscious bias. The speaker was a woman, and brought up the fact that if she had a male voice that we, the audience would be more prone to listen to her and agree due to the fact that it was a man's voice.

Extension Proposal

For my extension proposal, I think an interesting thing to put on the list would be Every Day by David Leviathan. The book is about a genderless, figureless character who names themselves A, and wakes up every day in a new body, with access to that person's memories and daily life ritual. Every day, they act like that different person. I think this situation has to do a lot with intuition, as A has to deal with different people's experiences and personalities as their own, and therefore the intuition can fluctuate. I find this interesting and propose this to the list of elective readings because we can see which personalities and individuals are more intuitive than others in just one singular character.

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