Cause and Effect Exploration Morgan potter 2b

The Spanish Armada

An Armada of 132 ships carrying a total of 8,000 sailors and over 20,000 marines set sail on May 20th, in 1588. These ships sailed towards England with Santa Cruz as their leader. Their goal was to invade England and capture London for themselves and force the removal of Elizabeth. Despite the goals of the crew their voyage did not go as plan. The ships hit bad weather causing for massive damage and eventually as the events of the Spanish Armada ended they found themselves defeated.

Causes of the Spanish Armada

The events of the Spanish Armada were caused by many events that led to the actions of the Spanish against England. In 1587 the Roman Catholic, Mary Queen of Scots was executed by the English people and caused for Philip of Spain to crave revenge for her death. Not only this but the English "sea dogs" continually attacked Spanish ports and enraged the Spanish who's treasures they stole after such attacks. Lastly, the English were steadily growing a strong navy which caused the Spanish to fear future attacks that could be more severe or cause for a take over of their land.

Effects of the Spanish Armada

The events of the Spanish Armada left four lasting effects for the Spanish to then deal with. First, by choosing to sail to England and carry out the events of the voyage the 132 ships involved were caught in a large storm. Secondly, due to this voyage and this storm the Spanish ships were destroyed leaving their invasion to be less invasive. Next, it caused for the Spanish navy and government to weaken. This defeat not only impacted their current mission but also their future military/governmental actions. Lastly, the defeat of the Armada during their mission opened doors to the English and French to colonize North America.

Labor in the New World

As the new world became more and more established by European countries the quest for money become immense. As the European people established their new world community they began seeing many ways in which they can make money and become more wealthy for their mother country. One way in which they can make money is to use African and Native American people as slaves to do their own labor.

Causes of Labor in the New World

Due to the Americas being undiscovered before the Europeans their society had to be established from the ground up, this included building and farming. Due to this we have our causes behind the enslavement of Native Americans and Africans. The European colonies needed high amounts of labor to be done for them on farms and on buildings. The English also found wealth within the slave trade and were able to establish a form a business within it. They also needed large numbers of people to be able to produce their desired profit so this caused them to inhabit a whole race of people. Lastly the cause of labor was their need for mercantilism which is by definition a system in which a country attempts to amass wealth through trade with other countries, in other words slaves.

Effects of Labor in the New World

The start of labor in the new world had many effects on the world, some more horrifying than others. One effect is that many of the Native Caribbean people were completely decimated by disease. The European people brought over germs that the natives bodies were unable to fight off leaving many on their death bed. Secondly, Bartolome de Las Casas was a Spanish historian and missionary who protested on behalf of the native people and called for the European people to abolish slavery. The last effect of labor in the new world is the most effect that is still talked talked about today and leaves many uneasy, the Spanish and Portuguese began importing slaves from Africa. This began the outbreak of slavery in the soon to be, United States.

The Triangular Trade Route

The triangular trade route is exactly what its title says it is, it is a trade route between three countries that together make a triangular route. This route controls trade between Europe, Africa, and the Americas. The middle passage, part of the triangular trade route, was used to bring slaves from Africa to the Americas while raw materials were brought from America to Europe. These raw materials included precious medals and sugar.

Causes of the Triangular Trade Route

The main reason for the creation of the triangular trade route was to establish efficient means of travel between the three countries. The triangular shape allowed for easy transport of many goods, leading to the second cause for the route. The route needed to be able to transport many products. The more products that could be transported from point A to point B, the more money the Europeans could make for their mother country. Lastly, the trade route paid for itself by allowing the transporters to carry cargo from one country and not return empty handed, but return with more cargo to bring to the next location.

Effects of the Triangular Trade Route

The trade route effected Europe in a very profitable way. This route enabled Europeans to trade between Europe, Africa, and the Americas allowing them goods of much variety and more profit. It also created the "Middle Passage" that became a vital key for the people to transport their new laborers from Africa. Not only were they able to transport people but they were also able to transport precious medals and sugars to and from the countries. Lastly, it allowed for constant profit through trade, a ship that came from Europe to America would unload their goods only to reload and continue on to Africa with more goods to sell.

Spanish Invade the Inca

In the year 1532 under the power of Francisco Pizarro the Spanish people invaded the Inca's. Despite the Spanish having only one hundred and sixty Spaniards and the Inca people containing a whole empire, the Spanish came out on top. Within twenty years the Inca's once great empire was in complete ruins and Pizarro and his people were in complete control of the once Incan land.

Causes of the Spanish Conquering the Incas

While the Incan people may have had a whole empire behind them and the Spaniards only over a hundred soldiers, they were still able to invade and destroy the Inca society, this is due to many things. First off, the Spanish people had more effective weapons, this included guns but also steel swords. The Inca people had weapons made of stone whereas the Spanish had access to steel to make more effective weaponry. Secondly, the Spanish people had horses which caused for a great advantage over the Incans. The horses allowed for quick movement but also a more dominant fighting position when in combat with an Incan. Lastly, the Spanish used the element of surprise to attack the empire, when they first arrived they pretended to be friends to the Incas, the Incan people made the mistake of not seeing them as a threat.

Effects of the Spanish Conquering the Inca

After the Spanish invaded and successfully conquered the Inca, there were many effects visibly see in the aftermath. First off the Incan leader was captured by the Spanish people and used to their advantage until no longer needed. Second, small pox were now passed around the Incan people. Why did only the Incan people get small pox? This was due to the fact that the Spanish were exposed to domestic animals, the thing that infected people, while the Inca people were not. The most obvious effect of the invasion was that the Inca Empire was conquered and now belonged to the hands of the Spanish people who so brutally invaded and conquered it.

Work Cited

BBC - KS3 Bitesize History - The Armada : Revision, Page 2. (n.d.). Retrieved March 15, 2017, from http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/ks3/history/tudors_stuarts/the_armada/revision/2/

New World Labor Systems: American Indians · African Passages, Lowcountry Adaptations. (n.d.). Retrieved March 15, 2017, from http://ldhi.library.cofc.edu/exhibits/show/africanpassageslowcountryadapt/introductionatlanticworld/new_world_labor_systems

Bartolomé de Las Casas. (n.d.). Retrieved March 17, 2017, from https://www.britannica.com/biography/Bartolome-de-Las-Casas

Minster, C. (n.d.). Ten Facts About the Conquest of the Inca Empire. Retrieved March 17, 2017, from https://www.thoughtco.com/conquest-of-the-inca-empire-facts-2136551

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