Marcus Garvey Black Nationalist group leader

(Q) Marcus Garvey, in full Marcus Moziah Garvey, (born August 17, 1887, St. Ann’s Bay, Jamaica—died June 10, 1940, London, England), charismatic black leader who organized the first important American black nationalist movement (1919–26), based in New York City’s Harlem.
(P) Since Garvey was helping the black race he was given the nickname "Black Moses". He also wanted blacks to participate in white capitalism.
(Q) Black nationalism, political and social movement prominent in the 1960s and early ’70s in the United States among some African Americans. The movement, which can be traced back to Marcus Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association of the 1920s, sought to acquire economic power and to infuse among blacks a sense of community and group feeling.
(Q) The Garvey movement was characterized by colourful pageantry and appeals for the rediscovery of African heritage. Its goal was to establish an independent Africa through the return of a revolutionary vanguard of African Americans. Garvey’s great attraction among poor African Americans was not matched, however, among the black middle class, which resented his flamboyance and his scorn of their leadership. Indeed, one of Garvey’s sharpest critics was Du Bois, who shared Garvey’s basic goals and organized a series of small but largely ineffectual Pan-African conferences during the 1920s. The Garvey movement declined after Garvey was jailed for mail fraud in 1925 and deported to Jamaica in 1927.
(P) Marcus Garvey wanted to make his own. This is why he made the nationalist group for the black people that listened to him.
(P) Marcus tries to make all group seperate but equiviant. He doesnt really show nationalism to his country but he does to his group of people.
(P) Since his he agreed with the KKK, even though he didnt like their methods, he made a lot of enemies. These people thought there was another way and didnt have to believe everything Garvey said.
(Q) He served two years of a five-year prison term, but in 1927 his sentence was commuted by Pres. Calvin Coolidge, and he was deported as an undesirable alien. He was never able to revive the movement abroad, and he died in virtual obscurity.

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