Figurative language Betzaida bRavo ayon

A simile is a comparison between two different things using the word “like” or “as” to make the comparison. Similes are generally easier to identify than metaphors, but not always.Sometimes a speaker or writer may use the word “like” or “as” and not make any comparison. These are not similes.

Simile

Similes are one of the most common forms of figurative language and can be found just about anywhere: plays, poems, song lyrics, even everyday conversations. A simile is a figure of speech that compares two different things in an interesting way. The object of a simile is to spark an interesting connection in a reader's or listener's mind.

We can find simile examples in our daily speech. We often hear comments like “John is as slow as a snail.” Snails are notorious for their slow pace and here the slowness of John is compared to that of a snail. The use of “as” in the example helps to draw the resemblance. Some more examples of common similes are given below.

Hyperbole is an extreme exaggeration used to make a point. It is like the opposite of “understatement.” It is from a Greek word meaning “excess.”

Hyperbole

Hyperboles can be found in literature and oral communication. They would not be used in nonfiction works, like medical journals or research papers; but, they are perfect for fictional works, especially to add color to a character or humor to the

Hyperboles are comparisons, like similes and metaphors, but are extravagant and even ridiculous. They are not meant to be taken literally.

If used properly, hyperbole can encourage consumers to buy products. There has been limited research into this area, but a 2007 study by Mark A. Callister PhD & Lesa A. Stern PhD, "The Role of Visual Hyperbole in Advertising Effectiveness" found that "hyperbolic ads produce more ad liking than nonhyperbolic ads".

Metaphor

A metaphor is a figure of speech that refers, for rhetorical effect, to one thing by mentioning another thing.

It may provide clarity or identify hidden similarities between two ideas. Antithesis, hyperbole, metonymy and simile are all types of metaphor.

It may provide clarity or identify hidden similarities between two ideas. Antithesis, hyperbole, metonymy and simile are all types of metaphor.

This quotation expresses a metaphor because the world is not literally a stage. By asserting that the world is a stage, Shakespeare uses points of comparison between the world and a stage to convey an understanding about the mechanics of the world and the behavior of the people within it.

Personification

Personification is when you give human qualities or abilities to an object or animal. It is a literary tool that adds interest and fun to a poem or story. When a writer brings a non-human object to life it can help us understand better what they're trying to say

Everyone knows what a person is, but do you know what personification is? Personification is when you assign the qualities of a person to something that isn't human or, in some cases, to something that isn't even alive. There are many reasons for using personification. It can be used as a method of describing something so that others can understand.

Idioms

Idioms for kids are word combinations that kids use which have a different meaning than the literal meanings of each word.

Idioms exist in every language. An idiom is a word or phrase that is not taken literally, like “bought the farm” has nothing to do with purchasing real estate, but refers to dying.

Allusions

An allusion is when a person or author makes an indirect reference in speech, text, or song to an event or figure.

Often the allusions made are to past events or figures, but sometimes allusions are made to current famous people or events.

The allusion does not give much detail about the reference-it does not describe things in detail. Rather, because these events are momentous-significant historically, culturally, or politically-the speaker or author expects that people in general would understand the allusion without explanation.

Allusions are often used within a metaphor or simile. The comparison alludes to an event or person of significance that everyone should understand.

Allusions often make reference to previous works of literature, especially references to the Bible and Greek or Roman mythology.

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