Darwin's theory By Autum Wyatt

Darwinism is a theory of biological evolution developed by the English naturalist Charles Darwin, 1809–1882, and others, stating that all species of organisms arise and develop through the natural selection of small, inherited variations that increase the individual's ability to compete, survive, and reproduce. Darwinism is a theory of biological evolution developed by the English naturalist Charles Darwin, 1809–1882, and others, stating that all species of organisms arise and develop through the natural selection of small, inherited variations that increase the individual's ability to compete, survive, and reproduce . Darwin's Theory link

The level of support for evolution among scientists, the public and other groups is a topic that frequently arises in the creation-evolution controversy and touches on educational, religious, philosophical, scientific and political issues. The subject is especially contentious in countries where significant levels of non-acceptance of evolution by general society exist although evolution is taught at school and university. The overwhelming majority of the scientific community accepts evolution as the dominant scientific theory of biological diversity. Nearly every scientific society, representing hundreds of thousands of scientists, has issued statements rejecting intelligent design and a petition supporting the teaching of evolutionary biology was endorsed by 72 US Nobel Prize winners.

There are religious sects and denominations in several countries for whom the theory of evolution is in conflict with creationism that is central to their dogma, and who therefore reject it: in the United States, the Muslim world, South Africa, India, South Korea, Singapore, the Philippines, and Brazil, with smaller followings in the United Kingdom, the Republic of Ireland, the Netherlands, Japan, Italy, Germany, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada.

The vast majority of the scientific community and academia supports evolutionary theory as the only explanation that can fully account for observations in the fields of biology, paleontology, molecular biology, genetics, anthropology, and others.One 1987 estimate found that "700 scientists, out of a total of 480,000 U.S. earth and life scientists, give credence to creation-science". A 1991 Gallup poll found that about 5% of American scientists (including those with training outside biology) identified themselves as creationists. “Overall, the nation has a big problem,” he said in 2006. “Approximately half of the U.S. population thinks evolution does (or did) not occur. While 99.9 percent of scientists accept evolution, 40 to 50 percent of college students do not accept evolution and believe it to be 'just' a theory.” 2 Jun 2014

Darwin, whose Feb. 12 birthday is celebrated annually as Darwin Day, came from a family of doctors and was expected to follow in their path. However, he did not have the stomach for medicine and went to school to study theology instead. It was during his time at university when he became close with members of the science faculty. It was his biology professor who suggested to him that he accept a berth on the HMS Beagle, about to set sail to explore the South American coast. His discoveries and explorations on this journey would change the direction of his life forever. Darwin was not the first scientist to propose the idea of evolution. Others had done so before him, but they lacked a cohesive explanation of how life evolved on Earth. Darwin's theory, that of natural selection, offered an explanation that the scientific community—and society in general—could, at the very least, vigorously discuss.

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Created with images by Caroline Davis2010 - "DNA" • WikiImages - "charles darwin scientists theory of evolution"

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