Responsive Website Responsive web design is a great solution to our multi-screen problem, but getting into it from the print perspective is difficult. No fixed page size, no millimetres or inches, no physical constraints to fight against. Designing in pixels for Desktop and Mobile only is also the past, as more and more gadgets can open up a website. Therefore, let's clarify some basic principles of responsive web design here to embrace the fluid web, instead of fighting it.

Adobe
As you can see the Adobe website is fully responsive. As the screen sizes becomes smaller, content starts to take up more vertical space and anything below will be pushed down, this is known as the flow.
Maxim Gorki
This website demonstrates breakpoints, these allow the layout to change at predefined points, i.e. having 3 columns on a desktop, but only 1 column on a mobile device. Most CSS properties can be changed from one breakpoint to another. Usually where you put one depends on the content. If a sentence breaks, you might need to add a breakpoint. But use them with caution – it can get messy quickly when it's difficult to understand what is influencing what.
Circles Conference
This site is for a creative design conference by Circles Co. In regards to relative position; having a lot of elements depending on each other would be difficult to control, therefore wrapping elements in a container keeps it way more understandable, clean and tidy. This is where static units like pixels can help. They are useful for content that you don't want to scale, like logos and buttons.
BLEVOGUE.
BLEVOGUE. Fashion Blog 'Fashion loves something not traditional but delicious things. This is blog with fun and vital stories. This is elegance and kitsch.' Technically there isn't much of a difference if a project is started from a smaller screen to a bigger (mobile first) or vice versa (desktop first). Yet it adds extra limitations and helps you make decisions if you start with mobile first. Often people start from both ends at once, so really, go and see what works better for you.
Homepride Flour
Homepride Flour created a stunning photographic website for the iconic product. Discover the products, heritage, recipes and community that have powered Great British Baking since 1964. The canvas can be a desktop, mobile screen or anything in between. Pixel density can also vary, so we need units that are flexible and work everywhere. That's where relative units like percents come in handy. So making something 50% wide means it will always take half of the screen (or viewport, which is the size of the opened browser window).

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