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Join us: BRYT LEGISLATIVE BRiefing
BRYT supports students with Serious Emotional Disturbances (SEDs)
"During her freshman year of high school at Brookline High, Murielle Costentin, 14, was hospitalized for a mental health issue. She missed a month of school. For her and students in similar situations, the transition back to life in the classroom was not easy. To address this issue, the Brookline Center for Community Mental Health launched the Bridge for Resilient Youth in Transition, which provides support for students who miss school for mental health reasons."

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ThE 2018 William L. Boyan Award

William J. Ostiguy High School: A Safe, Sober Place for Teens

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Disrupting the School-to-Prison Pipeline
PPAL's Latest blog
"Let’s talk about enabling. Or rather, let’s talk about being accused of it. Happens quite often to parents like me. The first time I ever heard the word “enabler,” and later its sister words co-dependent and over-controlling, was early in my son’s mental health journey. He was doing progressively worse each day, exploding over minor things, threatening to hurt himself daily and I went looking for support and help. I made a long series of calls and finally got what I thought was a sympathetic and wise person on the phone. She listened, asked a few questions, then pronounced that I was an enabler."
CFJJ Report on police diversion in ma
"Seizing An Early Opportunity analyzes the findings of a survey of 95 police departments in Massachusetts regarding their formal and informal diversion practices. While diversion offers police departments an opportunity to reduce the negative impacts of justice system involvement on young people, practices are applied inconsistently and unequally across the state. This report examines examples of successful diversion programs and makes recommendations for improvement at the local and state level."
ICYMI: HEADLINES
"One in five college students reported thoughts of suicide in the past year, according to a new study by researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, a finding the researchers say highlights an urgent need to help young people reduce the overwhelming stress that can come with campus life. The study, published Thursday in the journal Depression & Anxiety, surveyed more than 67,000 college students at more than 100 colleges in the United States. It found that racial, sexual, and gender minorities are especially vulnerable, but that stress, mental health diagnoses, and risk of suicide or suicidal thoughts were common among all students."
"I couldn’t begin tell you what my old home phone number was before I moved. It takes me a moment to recall my mom’s cell on the rare occasion I have to dial it. But I can easily recite the suicide hotline number on command. Part of this, of course, is because I’ve been a mental health reporter for five years, so it’s embedded into my memory. Lately, however, the reason why it’s so ingrained in my brain is because of the tragic suicides of prominent figures like Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade, and the public reaction that follows."
"It may be a new school year, yet I come to sing the praises of trampolines and bubble-blowing, pillow forts and peekaboo, Monopoly and Marco Polo. A new paper in the journal Pediatrics summarizes the evidence for letting kids let loose. "Play is not frivolous," the paper insists, twice. "It is brain building." The authors — Michael Yogman, Andrew Garner, Jeffrey Hutchinson, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek and Roberta Michnick Golinkoff — ask pediatricians to take an active role by writing a "prescription for play" for their young patients in the first two years of life."
"Educators begin this year with the highest hopes for our students’ academic achievements and holistic progress. Our responsibility to students does not begin when they enter our schools in the morning, nor does it end when they exit our doors at the end of each day. As teachers, we recognize the individuality of each student. There is no “standard” or “average” Boston Public Schools student. As an urban district, we welcome children who come to us with a vast array of strengths and challenges. This includes different learning styles, skills, and abilities. For some children, it also includes a history of trauma. Many of our students may also experience economic challenges, housing instability, and food insecurity."
"Making sense of the connections between social determinants and individual mental health isn’t always easy. Factors like education, economic stability, social connection, neighborhood and community context, built infrastructure, and access to healthcare all impact a person’s well-being. So how do you know which determinants are at play, and what can you do to address them?"
"Keeping good employees is a challenge for any industry. But for childcare centers the struggle is particularly acute, with a roughly 30 percent turnover rate each year. In a field where institutional knowledge translates to better quality care, industry leaders are straining to find ways to keep their staff for longer than a few years."
"The cost of health care in Massachusetts continues to rise, but at a pace significantly below expectations. The state Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA) finds health care spending grew 1.6 percent from 2016 to 2017, with costs totaling $61.1 billion. That's about $8,900 per resident."
"Children registering for school in Florida this year were asked to reveal some history about their mental health. The new requirement is part of a law rushed through the state legislature after the February shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. The state's school districts now must ask whether a child has ever been referred for mental health services on registration forms for new students."

Credits:

Created with images by Feliphe Schiarolli - "This is Brazil." • David Kennedy - "Hallway Dweller" • Green Chameleon - "Designer sketching Wireframes" • Marcus Wallis - "Family Hangs" • Olichel - "dad son walking family father child happy" • Andrik Langfield - "Yellow rain jacket ducks"

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