Grand Teton National Park by- adrian henson

INTRODUCTION

Grand Teton National Park is in the northwest of the U.S state of Wyoming. It encompasses the Teton mountain range, the 4,000-meter Grand Teton peak, and the valley known as Jackson Hole. It’s a popular destination in summer for mountaineering, hiking, backcountry camping and fishing, linked to nearby Yellowstone National Park by the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway. It was established on February 26, 1929.

Natural

Wildlife is never far away in Grand Teton National Park. High in the mountains, a yellow-bellied marmot whistles a warning as a golden eagle soars above. Searching for insect larvae, a black bear rips into a rotten lodgepole pine log. On the valley floor, a herd of bison graze as a coyote trots through the sagebrush, looking for a meal. Along the Snake River, an osprey dives into the water with talons extended, rising with a cutthroat trout. In a nearby meadow, a moose browses the tender buds of willows that grow in this water-rich environment. Lupine, arrowleaf balsalmroot, paintbrush, and spring beauty are wildflowers commonly found in Grand Teton National Park.

Wildlife in Grand Teton

History

Many of these forces are powerful and their impact is easily and readily observed. Some, however, work on a time-scale that is imperceptible, but change the landscape in no less dramatic a fashion. Some changes are the result of natural processes and some are the result of human actions. It is certain, however, that change is a constant in the Teton Range.Natural disturbances range from earthquakes to fires to floods to volcanic eruptions. Human-caused disturbances include road construction, agriculture, and urban/suburban development. Disturbed lands may be barren, void of plant and animal life, following an incident. Some native species of plants thrive after a disruption of the natural balance. The first returnees to a burned area, for instance, are grasses that take advantage of increased sunlight, decreased shade, increased nutrients in the soil, and lower acidity levels in the soil.

Management

Fire managers at Grand Teton National Park seek to strike a balance between restoring and maintaining natural processes associated with fire, and protecting human life and property.The National Park Service (NPS) mission is to protect and preserve the lands it manages for the enjoyment of future generations. Guided by this mandate, the fire management program focuses on restoring and maintaining natural processes associated with fire, while protecting human life and property. To help in achieving these long-term goals, the NPS has a comprehensive fire management program including hazardous fuels reduction, prescribed fire, wildland fire for resource benefit, and wildland fire suppression.From November 1, 2016 through March 5, 2017 all visitor centers in the park are closed.

Credits:

Created with images by mrbcinvt - "amphitheater lake grand teton national park" • Loco Steve - "Map of the Green River watershed." • Shutterfly Pictures - "Canyon Village to Tower-Roosevelt Route" • donjd2 - "Bison" • fchelaru - "IMG_3963" • gingi0 - "Grand Teton Wildflowers" • jeffgunn - "Grand Teton National Park"

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