3 ways to make bacon Conduction, Convection and radiation (By: alex Johnson)

CONDUCTION

Conduction

Start the bacon in a cold pan, laying the strips in the skillet before you turn on a low to medium-low flame. Soon the bacon will begin to release some of its fat. When it starts to buckle and curl, use the tongs to loosen the strips and turn each slice to cook on the other side. Keep flipping and turning the bacon so that it browns evenly and cook to desired crispness. Lay the cooked pieces on a paper towel, brown paper bag or newspapers to drain while you cook the rest of the package. Pour off the bacon fat between batches so your slices won't be dripping with grease.

Convection

Preheat the oven to 400° and lay the bacon on a foil-lined baking sheet. (For even crispier bacon, set a metal cooling rack over the foil-lined baking sheet and lay the raw bacon over the cooling rack.) Bake for 15-20 minutes, depending on the thickness of your bacon, and use tongs to transfer it to a paper-lined platter to drain and finish crisping.

Radiation

L ine a microwave-safe dish with at least 4 layers of paper towels, arrange the bacon in a single layer, and cover with 2 more layers of paper towels. Microwave on HIGH for 1 minute per slice of bacon and check for readiness. If needed, microwave in additional 30 second bursts until the bacon is just shy of being as done as you like it — the bacon will cook a little more once you remove it from the microwave. Transfer the cooked bacon to a plate, so it doesn't stick to the paper towels.

Credits:

Created with images by phouavang82 - "bacon fry food" • p_x_g - "Bacon"

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