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Photographing Washington, D.C. my photos, my words

I visited Washington, D.C. on business frequently before I retired and, on a few occasions, I had time to walk around with my camera. I had a few more opportunities to photograph the D.C. area on post-retirement trips. It’s a photo-rich environment, with the variety of historic federal buildings, monuments and memorials, and the subject of my featured gallery for February.

U.S. Capitol building at night, Washington, D.C.

I typically get shots of the Capitol, primarily because I’m often in a nearby hotel and it’s easy to hit Capitol Hill when I have a few minutes.

Visitors and reflected in the Vietnam Memorial wall, Washington, D.C.

And I often shoot the Vietnam Memorial. It’s a very emotional site because that was my generation’s war and I knew some of the names on the wall. The reflective stone makes it an interesting photo location.

Washington Monument and Reflecting Pool, Washington, D.C.

And it’s hard not to shoot the Washington Monument. It’s the tallest structure in D.C.

As is typical when I'm shooting in a city, I carry a variety of shorter lenses when I'm in D.C. I seldom find the need for telephoto lenses.

The U.S, Capitol is bathed by the afternoon sun in Washington, D.C.
Washington Monument and Reflecting Pool, Washington, D.C.
Arched walkway at Union Station, Washington, D.C.
A quiet moment at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D.C.
Plants in the Enid A. Haupt Garden at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., brighten the walk to the Smithsonian castle housing the museum's information center.
U.S. Capitol building at night, Washington, D.C.
A few of the White House behind the north lawn, Washington, D.C.
The Smithsonian Institution Building, commonly known as the castle, stands on the south side of the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The statue in front of the building honors Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian (1846-1878).
U.S. Army sentinel protects the Tomb of the Unknowns, Arlington Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
Reading room in the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
A reflection of the Washington Monument is seen behind names on the Vietnam Memorial wall, Washington, D.C.
A sign reminds visitors to Arlington Cemetery about proper behavior, Arlington, Va.
Orange flowers mark the way to the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.
Infinity, an abstract sculpture designed by Jose de Rivera and created by Roy Gussow, sits outside the south entrance of the National Museum of American History, Washington, DC.
Visitors search for a name on the Vietnam Memorial wall, Washington, D.C.
Washington Monument surrounded by clouds, Washington, D.C.
A statue of Thomas Jefferson stands in the center of the chamber of the Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C.
Visitors walk past the fountains in the World War II Memorial in Washington, DC.
Mount Vernon, George Washington's home in Virginia, as seen from the front.
The view of the towering arches of the main hall of Union Station, the historic train station in Washington, D.C.
At the Korean War Memorial in Washington, DC, a stainless-steel statue of a soldier - windblown poncho protecting him from the weather while his eyes stay alert for danger - walks point as a squad of 19 leaves the cover of trees while on patrol. The 19 statues, created by Frank Gaylord, are a realistic part of a memorial that includes a polished black granite wall with faces etched into the granite, reflecting the statues; an adjacent Pool of Remembrance; and various other granite or stone structures containing etched information about the war, which lasted from 1950 to 1953. The Korean War Memorial was dedicated on July 27, 1995.
Looking up toward skylight from under a spiral staircase, Hotel Monaco, Washington, D.C.
The Washington Monument is silhouetted against a deep blue sky at sunset, Washington, D.C.
Gravestones line a hillside in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
A fountain is the centerpiece of the National World War II Memorial in Washington, DC. The memorial opened in spring 2004.
Visitors stand at Abe Lincoln's feet at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D.C.
Visitors walk beside the base of the Washington Monument, Washington, DC.
A portrait of Ben Franklin has a prominent position in an alcove of the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.
The U.S. Capitol Building is framed by flowers and trees, Washington, D.C.
The Lincoln Memorial as seen from the World War II Memorial, Washington, D.C.
The Washington Monument, a stand of trees and bicycle racks create a pattern of vertical objects, Washington, DC.
The view from the stage of the Memorial Amphitheater, Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
Looking down a spiral staircase, Hotel Monaco, Washington, D.C.
Infinity, an abstract sculpture designed by Jose de Rivera and created by Roy Gussow, stands outside the south entrance to the National Museum of American History, Washington, DC.
A small plot of green space occupies the middle of a courtyard between reflecting glass buildings at 400 and 444 N. Capitol St. NE in Washington, DC.
Flowers in the shape of a red number 1, the shape of the First Division patch, grow in front of the First Division Monument in Washington, DC.
A chapel is surrounded by graves in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.
Bright, ornate walls and marble arches and columns make the Great Hall in the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., a spectacular sight.
The U.S. Capitol Building stands above fall leaves, Washington, D.C.
Doorways lead from the main hall of Union Station to the trains, Washington, D.C.
The Washington Monument stands above two security poles on a sidewalk to the east of the monument on a bright November afternoon in Washington, D.C.
The Lincoln Memorial stands across the reflecting pool from the World War II Memorial as viewed from the Washington Monument, Washington, D.C.
Looking up at the marble columns and ceiling at the entrance to the Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C.
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Created By
Pat Hemlepp
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