Malaria Morgan Daniels

Malaria is from an infected bite on a human that was caused form a mosquito. The symptoms are fever, sweating, and periodic chills. Malaria is a serious health problem. The World Health Organization runs a control program for Malaria. 250 million people a year get the disease and only 900,000 people die from it.

Malaria is named from an Italian word mal´aria which means bad air. Malaria mostly happens in poor, tropical and subtropical areas. Symptoms usually last six-ten hours and occur in every second day. An Estimated 3.4 billion people and over 106 countries are at risk. Most common times for Mosquitoes who are infected are active between dusk and dawn.

Nearly half of the worlds population is at risk. Children under five are at a higher risk. Also Pregnant woman are at a higher risk. Malaria causes huge losses in high burden countries. Malaria is preventable and curable. You actually get the disease from a female Anopheles mosquitoes.

3 billion kids are exposed to Malaria. That is one child every forty five seconds. Thing that will help you prevent Malaria are using distribute nets. You can also use an Anti Malaria medicine/ drug. Left untreated Malaria can leave the body susceptible to malnutrition. Were actually closer to coming over Malaria then ever before.

Malaria can not go from one person to another so in other words its not contagious. Instead the mosquito bites the infected person and bites the next human but that is only when the mosquito has the disease. The most common type of symptoms are the ¨Malaria Ague¨ (chills and fever). The beginning stages are uncontrollable shivering for an hour or two, followed by a spike temperature as high as a 106 fever. Which that last about to three or six hours. After that you just begin to sweat.

In 1945 Walt Disney was called to do Propaganda about Malaria and he choose to use the characters from the seven dwarfs. Drinking can increase your chances on Malaria. Twenty percent of the people with Malaria die of the Anti Malaria drug. Mosquitoes with Malaria behave like vampires. It can take at least four years to develop the symptoms.

Mostly Travelers that go to foreign countries are most likely to get it. Approximately 1,500-2,000 cases are involved with recent travelers. 3.2 billion people are at a higher risk in 106 countries. Most people with health conditions are at risk . Between 1957-2015 there have been sixty-three outbreaks in the U.S.

Malaria drove the creation of CDC Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria was a problem in James Town. DDT was a primary weapon in the U.S dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane. Eight President had Malaria the eight were George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, James Monroe, Andrew Jackson, John F Kennedy, Ulysses S Grant, Theodore Roosevelt, and James A Garfield.

Severe Malaria has three or two stages. The symptoms usually include organ failures, and low blood pressure. Malaria is mostly located in India. If Malaria is detected early illness can go away. Pregnant Woman are able to give the diseases to their Infant. Malaria can cause red blood cells to be sticky.

Works Cited

"10 Facts on Malaria." World Health Organization. World Health Organization. Web. 20 Apr. 2017.

Lam, Peter. "Malaria: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments." Medical News Today. MediLexicon International. Web. 20 Apr. 2017.

"Malaria." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 6 May. 2011. Web. 28 Apr. 2017.

"Malaria." Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine, 3rd Ed. Encyclopedia.com. Web. 20 Apr. 2017.

"Malaria." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 28 Mar. 2017. Web. 21 Apr. 2017.

"Malaria Facts." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 15 Apr. 2016. Web. 21 Apr. 2017.

"Malaria – Symptoms, Causes and Facts - Blog Aster Medcity." Aster Medcity. Web. 20 Apr. 2017.

Rothwell, James. "Seven Facts You Didn't Know about Malaria." The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group, 24 July 2015. Web. 20 Apr. 2017.

"Top 10 Facts About Malaria." Global Concerns Classroom. 30 Dec. 2011. Web. 20 Apr. 2017.

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Created with images by Bien Stephenson - "Malaria"

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