The Globe Theater Amber Doesburg p.3

Thesis: The Globe Theater was a huge and famous theater in the 1590's, the theater's greatest attributes are shown by its history, design, and the actors.

History:

Quote #1: "Shakespeare was one of six shareholders who signed the lease for the new site in 1599. He thus became part of the first group of actor-sharers to also be theater owners. Although this arrangement meant considerable financial risk, it also promised to be profitable if the new theater was a success" (Lander).

Commentary: In order to make a new theater, it had to have a considerable amount of shareholders, Shakespeare was one of them making the theater officially open in 1599. In order to make the theater worth while, Shakespeare signed the share hold with the hope that the theater would do great

Quote #2: "The Globe proved to be a wise investment, and it remained a home to Shakespeare’s acting company until the religious reformers known as Puritans closed the theaters in 1642, during the English Civil War" (Lander).

Commentary: When Shakespeare joined the Globe Theater, he was promised huge gain if the theater was successful. The theater did great and was the best theater in London.

Quote #3: "Shakespeare was one of six shareholders who signed the lease for the new site in 1599. He thus became part of the first group of actor-sharers to also be theater owners. Although this arrangement meant considerable financial risk, it also promised to be profitable if the new theater was a success" (Lander).

Commentary: In order to make a new theater, it had to have a considerable amount of shareholders, Shakespeare was one of them making the theater officially open in 1599. In order to make the theater worth while, Shakespeare signed the share hold with the hope that the theater would do great success.

Design:

Quote #4: "...a large platform stage that projected from one end into the yard open to the sky. In the back wall of this stage was a curtained-off inner stage. Flanking the inner stage were two doors for entrances and exits. Above in this inner stage was a small balcony or upper stage, which could be used to suggest Juliet's balcony or the high wall of a castle or the bridge of a ship. Trapdoors were placed in the floor of the main stage for the entrances and exits of ghosts and for descents into hell" (Anderson 779).

Commentary: The Globe Theater had a huge stage in order to be able to show details throughout the play. It had different sections, an upper stage, and trapdoors to convey the meaning of plays that were presented. The Globe Theater needed something special in order for it to make its fame, the huge stage and new trapdoors and upper balcony made it possible for it to stand out from normal theaters.

Quote #5: "The stage was surrounded by several levels of seating. In 1613, the Globe burned down. It was rebuilt on the same foundation and reopened in 1614. The Globe was shut down in 1642 and torn down in 1644. A reconstruction of the theater was completed 200 yards (183 meters) from the original site in 1996, and it officially opened in 1997" (Michael).

Commentary: Although the Globe Theater was rebuilt twice, the seating has always had the classic multi-leveled seating formation. This allowed everyone to have a clear view and it made everything echo better since they only had their voices.

Quote #6: "...a protecting roof (also referred to as a stage-cover), held up by giant posts rising from the main platform. It would appear from drawings of the Bankside that every playhouse contemporaneous with the Globe had a superstructure of one or multiple huts, but the Globe's huts, or "heavens", seem the most elaborate" (Mabillard).

Commentary: The Globe Theater had a huge stage and along with a huge roof, the designs of the roof were made to represent heaven. During plays the huge stage and roof made the play feel more real and gave it more details. Plays in those times would often involved religious works making the plays show characters going to heaven.

Quote #7: "Underneath the floors of the outer and inner stages was a large cellar called "hell", allowing for the dramatic appearance of ghosts. This cellar was probably as big as the two stages combined above it, and it was accessed by two or more trap-doors on the outer stage and one trap door (nicknamed "the grave trap") on the inner stage" (Mabillard).

Commentary: Plays would often times show a character going to hell or heaven as they would use these tricks to show the transition. Doing such tricks made the audience believe the story and make the play more entertaining to watch.

Actors:

Quote #8: "Plays were originally performed by the all-male medieval trade guilds, so all women's parts were played by boys. It would be many years before women appeared on the stage in the professional English theater” (Anderson779).

Commentary: Women did not have the same respect as they do now, therefore plays would only have male actors. Since males would be the only actors in the play, with characters such a Juliet, there would be no kissing scene, only the language to portray what was going on.

Quote #9: "But costumes were often elaborate, and the stage might have been hung with colorful banners and trappings” (Anderson 779).

Commentary: Costumes had to be eye catching and bold enough for the audience to be able to tell who and what the character was. If the costumes were not elaborate, than the play would lack entertainment and people would be confused on what character was being portrayed.

Quote #10: "Rising from behind the stages was the tiring-house, the three story section of the playhouse that contained the dressing rooms, the prop room, the musician's gallery, and connecting passageways...Two doors on either side of the tiring-house allowed the actors entrance onto the stage. Sometimes an actor would come through the "middle door", which really referred to the main floor curtains of the tiring-house that led directly onto center stage” (Mabillard).

Commentary: In order for actors to transition from act to act they need a play to change and get ready for the next part. The tiring-house was made for hiding the parts of the play the audience was not supposed to see.

Works Cited:

Anderson, Robert. “Shakespeare And His Theater: A Perfect Match.” Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 778-80.

Anderson, Robert. “William Shakespeare’s Life: A Genius from Stratford.” Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 776-77.

Mabillard, Amanda. The Globe Theatre. Shakespeare Online. 20 Aug. 2008.

MLA:Lander, Jesse M. “Shakespeare, William.” World Book Advanced. World Book, 2016. Web. 30 Nov. 2016.

APA:Lander, J. M. (2016). Shakespeare, William. In World Book Advanced. Retrieved from

http://worldbookonline.com/advanced/article?id=ar504520

Harvard:Lander, JM 2016, ‘Shakespeare, William’ , World Book Advanced, World Book, Chicago, viewed 30 November 2016,

<http://worldbookonline.com/advanced/article?id=ar504520>.

MLA:Seidel, Michael. “Globe Theatre.” World Book Advanced. World Book, 2016. Web. 2 Dec. 2016.

APA:Seidel, M. (2016). Globe Theatre. In World Book Advanced. Retrieved from

http://worldbookonline.com/advanced/article?id=ar226380

Harvard:Seidel, M 2016, ‘Globe Theatre’ , World Book Advanced, World Book, Chicago, viewed 2 December 2016,

<http://worldbookonline.com/advanced/article?id=ar226380>.

Credits:

Created with images by tonynetone - "William Shakespeare" • Peter Glyn - "Globe Theatre" • redheaded_pirate - "Shakespeare's Globe Theatre" • ms.Tea - "globe theater"

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