The Ocean's Depths Nick D'Alessandro

How deep is the Ocean

The ocean's average depth is around 12,000 feet deep. The deepest part of the ocean is called challenger deep. It is located inside the Mariana Trench. It is 36,070 feet or 10,994 meters deep. Species of all types can live at depths we wouldn't be able to survive for seconds without protection comfortably.

What is the ocean floor like

The ocean floor is actually very similar to the floor of the ground. It has mountains, valleys of sand, and canyons.

What Species can live at the Bottom of the Ocean

Thousands of species live deeper than we could ever survive and many more haven't been discovered yet.

Frilled shark, Vampire squid, Fang tooth fish, Pacific viperfish

How Can Animals Survive so Deep

The sperm whale and bottlenose whale live at depths up to 6,000 feet, but they routinely go from the surface to depths greater than 6,000 feet. Whales have re enforced lungs to prevent them from collapsing upon pressure. Deep down in the ocean there is no light, so deep see fish tend to have larger eyes or since vibrations in the water. Some animals produce their own light from an organ called photophores. Deep sea animals are made up of liquids that are harder to compress. Also, they have gas filled buoyancy bladders.

Bottlenose Whale and Sperm Whale

Trenches in The Ocean

Trenches make up the deepest spots on the Earth. Trenches are a result of plates shifting. There are formed when a dense plate meets a less dense plate and the denser plate gets sucked down. This is called subduction.

Diagram of how trenches are made and what happens when they are made.

How Deep Have we Explored

James Cameron ventured into the worlds deepest point at challenger deep. In his single person sub he reached a depth of 35,756 feet. This happened in March of 2012.

Sources

http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/photos/deep-sea-creatures/#/deep-sea01-frill-shark_18161_600x450.jpg

http://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/ocean-trench/

http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/oceandepth.html

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