Who is William Shakespeare ? Alanna williams-lizarraga p.6

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Globe Theater 1

Source:

Hager, Alan, ed. "Globe Theatre." <i>Encyclopedia of British Writers, 16th and 17th Centuries</i>. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2005. <i>Bloom's Literature</i>, Facts On File, Inc.

Quote:

"In 1613, during a performance of Shakespeare's Henry VIII , a cannon shot during a staged battle ignited the thatched roof, and the Globe burned to the ground without serious casualties. Within a year the theater was rebuilt, this time with a tile roof, and it continued to host performances until 1642 when the Puritan government, strongly opposed to all forms of entertainment, shuttered every theater in London. The Globe was torn down two years later."

Paraphrase:

During a stage performance, a canon ignited and shot through the Globe Theater. Although it caused a considerable amount of damage to the beautiful architecture of the theater, there were no major physical injuries. After a year it was rebuilt with few moderations. It endured its same success until the Puritan government denied all forms of entertainment in London and tore down the Globe Theater just two years later.

Globe Theater 2

Source:

"Globe Theatre." <i>Hutchinson Encyclopedia Of Britain</i> (2014): 5129. <i>History Reference Center</i>. Web. 8 Dec. 2016.

Quote:

"The campaign to rebuild the theatre was begun by US film director Sam Wanamaker (1919-1993), who established the Globe Playhouse Trust site in 1949, just 183 m/200 yds from the first Globe site. A decades-long battle for funds followed, resolved finally by a British National Lottery grant."

Paraphrase:

After the heartbreaking burning of the Globe theater, a campaign was initiated to build a mock of the original model. It was accepted and was built just yards away from where the famous, original Globe Theater was located only decades before.

Globe Theater 3

Source:

Hager, Alan, ed. "Globe Theatre." <i>Encyclopedia of British Writers, 16th and 17th Centuries</i>. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2005. <i>Bloom's Literature</i>, Facts On File, Inc.

Quote:

"The Globe held 3,000 people, and its audiences were composed of members from all social classes. Lords and ladies, whores and thieves, and barristers, professors, and students, and just about everyone in between attended plays at the Globe."

Paraphrase:

The Globe Theater was a welcoming, loved, and an enjoyed place to be. All social classes and titles were accepted. It held a large crowd to ensure pleasure for the audience.

Life 1

Source:

"William Shakespeare." <i>Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6Th Edition</i> (2016): 1-4. <i>History Reference Center</i>. Web. 30 Nov. 2016.

Quote:

"His father, John Shakespeare , was successful in the leather business during Shakespeare's early childhood but later met with financial difficulties."

Paraphrase:

Shakespeare's father was a very successful man in his leather business. However, when he was older his family faced financial problems. Shakespeare pushed through these issues and pursued his love for literature.

Life 2

Source:

Lander, Jesse M. "Shakespeare, William." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 7 Dec. 2016.

Quote:

"Stratford also offered other pleasures. The fields and woods surrounding the town provided opportunities to hunt and trap small game. The River Avon, which ran through the town, had fish to catch. Shakespeare’s poems and plays show a love of nature and rural life. This display undoubtedly reflects his childhood experiences and his love of the Stratford countryside"

Paraphrase:

Although Shakespeare found different interests than his peers. He combined his pleasure with those around him to create modern and related literature. It also reflects his infatuation and respect for his hometown.

Life 3

Source:

"William Shakespeare." <i>Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6Th Edition</i> (2016): 1-4. <i>History Reference Center</i>. Web. 30 Nov. 2016.

Quote:

"In 1582 Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway, eight years his senior and pregnant at the time of the marriage. They had three children: Susanna, born in 1583, and twins, Hamnet and Judith, born in 1585. Nothing is known of the period between the birth of the twins and Shakespeare's emergence as a playwright in London (c.1592)."

Paraphrase:

Shakespeare seemed the live the average life, aside from his great job. He was married and had three children. There isn't much evidence or information on the time periods of these events.

Life 4

Source:

Anderson, Robert. "William Shakespeare's Life: A Genius from Stratford." Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking , by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 776-77.

Quote:

"Shakespeare died on April 23, 1616, at the age of fifty-two. He is buried under the old stone floor in the chancel of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford... His bones have lain undisturbed to this day." (Anderson 777)

Paraphrase:

When Shakespeare died on April 23, 1616 he was peacefully buried under the stone floor of the Holy Trinity Church in Stratford. With respect, his bones still remain untouched.

Plays 1

Source:

RAVILIOUS, KATE. "The Bard At Home." <i>Archaeology</i> 69.4 (2016): 44-47. <i>History Reference Center</i>. Web. 18 Nov. 2016.

Quote:

"Soon after, in 1597, the 33-year-old playwright, who was by that time the talk of London, was drawn back to his roots in Stratford-upon-Avon, the small market town about 100 miles northwest of London, where he was born." (Ravilious)

Paraphrase:

Shakespeare's plays where talk of the town. He was quickly noticed and he soon became a demand for the public's entertainment. Shakespeare's hometown was overjoyed with his success.

Plays 2

Source:

Lander, Jesse M. "Shakespeare, William." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 7 Dec. 2016.

Quote:

"To establish the order in which Shakespeare's plays were probably written and first performed, scholars have relied on a variety of literary and historical evidence. This evidence includes records of performances, mention of Shakespeare's works by other Elizabethan writers, and references in Shakespeare's plays to events of the day. Scholars can also roughly date a play by Shakespeare's literary style. But for many of the plays, precise dates remain uncertain."

Paraphrase:

There are no official documents of Shakespeare's original writing. Because of this, there is a lot of unknown information about his literature. Close to all of the knowledge on Shakespeare is inferred.

Plays 3

Quote:

"Since his death Shakespeare's plays have been almost continually performed, in non-English-speaking nations as well as those where English is the native tongue; they are quoted more than the works of any other single author"

Paraphrase:

Since Shakespeare has died, his legacy lives on by his plays being performed and his literature being taught. He has become one of the most famous and well known writer.

Plays 4

Source:

---. "Shakespeare and His Theater: A Perfect Match." Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking , by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 778-80.

Quote:

"In 1576, outside of the city walls of London, an actor-manager named James Burbage built the first permanent theater in England. He called it the Theater. Up to that time, touring acting companies had played wherever the could rent a space." (Anderson 778)

Paraphrase:

During the time of 1576, an actor-manager named James Burbage built the first permanent theater in England. At the time, touring groups had performed in any vacant space with an audience.

Works Cited

Anderson, Robert. “Shakespeare and His Theater: A Perfect Match.” Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 778-80.

---. “William Shakespeare’s Life: A Genius from Stratford.” Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 776-77.

Baker, William. “Shakespeare, William.” In Baker, William, and Kenneth Womack, eds. The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2012. Bloom’s Literature.

“Globe Theatre.” Hutchinson Encyclopedia Of Britain (2014): 5129. History Reference Center. Web. 8 Dec. 2016.

Hager, Alan, ed. “Globe Theatre.” Encyclopedia of British Writers, 16th and 17th Centuries. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2005. Bloom’s Literature, Facts On File, Inc.

Lander, Jesse M. “Shakespeare, William.” World Book Advanced. World Book, 2016. Web. 7 Dec. 2016.

RAVILIOUS, KATE. “The Bard At Home.” Archaeology 69.4 (2016): 44-47. History Reference Center. Web. 18 Nov. 2016.

“William Shakespeare.” Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6Th Edition (2016): 1-4. History Reference Center. Web. 30 Nov. 2016.

Credits:

Created with images by WikiImages - "william shakespeare poet writer" • Karen Roe - "London 18/08/2010" • Stifts- och landsbiblioteket i Skara - "Shakespear" • Ben Sutherland - "Front cover of William Shakespeare's First Folio"

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