Hopes for Animals V.S. Reality of Animals Ally August - Current Events in India

There are so many laws that prohibits anyone from causing pain to animals across the board of India. Yet no one is following them, why doesn't India as a whole not care anymore? Many groups scattered throughout India is trying to help endangered species and stop animals from being mistreated. The Indian government has put in place for many years now laws that can put you in jail for injuring any and all animals. Killing or hurting any kind of animal even stray ones is a punishable offense. Trying to train bulls, monkeys etc. for entertainment is not allowed. Abandoning any animal for any kind of reason will put you in prison for up to three months. Organizing or participating in animal fights is a cognizable offence. Those are just a start of the laws, these laws were created for two reasons. One, India is a country that is very involved with animals in everyday life and wants the animals to be protected from ever being harmed. The other reason is their religions. Buddhists believe that is wrong to hurt or kill animals, because all beings are afraid of injury and death. It is easy to see the importance of animals because of the stories of Ganesha & Hanuman. They are very significant to Hinduism both characters are animals in a godly form. It is necessary for everyone to be aware of Indian animals and try and create a safe haven for them in a soon life.

Greater adjutant storks lived on a garbage dump near Gauhati, India

About 70 women have gotten together to help stop the endangerment of greater adjutant storks that remain in India today. There are only between 800 and 1,200 left due to deforestation and widespread development of wetlands. About 550 of the big birds live in these three village Purnima Devi Barman has taught these women and has related her religious importance of the greater adjutant stork and wants to save them.

  1. To kill or maim any animal, including stray animals, is a punishable offence. IPC Sections 428 and 429.
  2. Abandoning any animal for any reason can land you in prison for up to three months. Section 11(1)(i) and Section 11(1)(j), PCA Act, 1960.
  3. Neglecting an animal by denying her sufficient food, water, shelter and exercise or by keeping him chained/confined for long hours is punishable by a fine or imprisonment of up to 3 months or both. Section 11(1)(h), PCA Act, 1960.
  4. Bears, monkeys, tigers, panthers, lions and bulls are prohibited from being trained and used for entertainment purposes, either in circuses or streets. Section 22(ii), PCA Act, 1960.
  5. Organizing of or participating in or inciting any animal fight is a cognizable offence. Section 11(1)(m)(ii) and Section 11(1)(n), PCA Act, 1960.

India Lifts Ban on Controversial Bull Fighting Festival: This source informs that in previous years there was a ban on a centuries-old bull fighting festival called Jallikattu meaning, "bull-taming." The new Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu decided to "uphold the traditional cultural values" and agreed to let these bulls and men fight and wrestle. The Chief not only broke the law but broke his religion's values.

http://www.newsgram.com/why-jallikattu-is-not-same-as-spanish-bullfighting/

Pangolin- a prehistoric anteater. About 3500 pangolins are boiled alive in India every year, the meat and its scaled are traditionally used in Chinese medicine. This species keeps pests away and enrich soil with nutrients. There are many other animals that are not cared for in the wild. Many of India's laws are against what is going on to this poor species and others. Such as a sea cucumber, forest owls and sea horses. Why is nothing being done?

Pangolin

The death of a 1 1/2 year old penguin died at the Byculla Zoo last month.The AWBI (Animal Welfare Board of India) thought that the zoo was not habitable for penguins. Then the AWBI banned the import of all animals from abroad to the zoo. "AWBI officials said the state of most zoos in the country were in appalling conditions." Yet another unsanitary and unclean habitat of an animal in India.

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Allison August
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