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CONCEPT & DESIGN FRIEDL'S CABINET: A NEW SPACE FOR ART, LEARNING & CREATIVITY

FRIEDL'S CABINET: THE CHILDREN'S DRAWINGS FROM TEREZÍN is a new project currently developed by the Jewish Museum in Prague (JMP) www.jewishmuseum.cz. It is conceived for the JMP's Robert Guttmann Gallery and the adjacent patio situated on the ground floor of the complex of the JMP offices at U Stare skoly 1/3, Prague 1, Czech Republic in the close proximity of one of the most prominent historical landmarks of the UNESCO-listed historical district of Josefov (the Jewish Town of Prague), the Spanish Synagogue: http://bit.ly/2DRI433 >>>

View of the Cabinet's Exhibition Space & Creative Lab • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects

An integral part of the JMP regular tour, the Cabinet will serve two complementary functions: [1] permanent collection display featuring originals from the world's largest collection of children's art from the period of the Shoah* and [2] creative lab space for educational programs and workshops focusing on creativity and personal growth. (*Authentic drawings will be rotated every 12 months.)

Ground Plan of the Cabinet with an Interactive Table and Two Workshop Stations © © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects
The Cabinet's Communication Diagram (pink and purple: exhibition visitors, orange: program docents, green: program participants, red: visitors with disabilities) • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects
An Alternative Setup for Programs • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects

CONCEPTUAL BASICS • The idea of the Cabinet rests on two basic concepts: CABINET OF DRAWINGS - a specific form of storing, organizing, and making accessible rare, original drawings and other sensitive materials • TEACHER’S CABINET - a trove of authentic results of an unparalleled pedagogical experiment. >>>

The Cabinet System of Drawers and Digital Components (Interactive Table and a Touch Screen Bar for Digital Content) • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects
Detailed View of the Interactive Table (Featuring Supporting Digital Content for the Exhibition & Interactive Applications for Programs) • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects

AESTHETICS • The Cabinet’s aesthetics alludes to the aesthetic principles of Bauhaus that influenced the work of Friedl Dicker-Brandeis and the circle of her friends and colleagues with maximum emphasis placed on functionality and simplicity of form. >>>

Entrance to the Cabinet (An Area Reserved for the Reception Desk, Custodians & Lockers) • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects
Preliminary Study in Gallery Furniture Components • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects
Color Diagrams (Inspiration Source for the Furniture & Interior Design) • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects

3 MAIN FEATURES OF THE CABINET • VARIABILTY - Regular rotation of the content to give visitors a reason to come back. • INTERACTIVITY - A space for active exploration, learning, hands-on experience, and play. • INCLUSIVENESS - Although the themes presented draw on specific Jewish experience, they are of interest to the wider public regardless of ethnic, cultural, or religious background, as well as age or social group. All of the display and interactive content will be available in Czech and English. >>>

The Main Space of the Cabinet with the Interactive Table in the Front (3D Simulation) • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects
The Patio (3D Simulation) • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects
The Patio (Site Plan & Section) • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects

THE NUTS & BOLTS • The system of drawers installed along the Cabinet’s eastern wall will contain both originals and replicas of 2D and 3D objects. While a premium is placed on the display of originals (historically it will be the first exhibition offering the visitors a close and properly contextualized view of authentic children’s drawings from Terezín), the concept of the Cabinet makes no essential distinction between originals, replicas, and digital content, all of which are equally important as sources of information and inspiration. >>>

Section of the Cabinet System with Drawers and Space for Light Stackable or Folding Furniture • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects
A Study in Furniture Functionality • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects

The Cabinet comprises three types digital content: THE MAIN NARRATIVE DIVIDED INTO 7 CHAPTERS presented on a "virtual bar" (a horizontal uninterrupted line of touchscreens hanging on the wall above the drawers) • DIGITAL CONTENT FOR SMALLER SCREENS placed directly in some select drawers – potentially 3 types: DIGITAL COLLAGES (mostly composed of digitized photographs, manuscripts, archival documents, and drawings, in some cases accompanied by an audio track or a minimal text information) • ORIGINAL FOOTAGE (mostly silent film recordings produced by both amateurs and professionals) • BROWSABLE DIGITIZED OBJECTS (e.g., diaries or photo albums) • APPLICATIONS FOR THE INTERACTIVE TABLE - a multi-touch screen providing access to well-structured supporting information and to applications allowing the visitor to try out various exercises focusing on rhythm or contrast and color principles). >>>

Detailed View of the Interactive Table with Multi-Touch functionality • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects

Another important feature of the Cabinet is the intention to employ technology (both hardware and software) that will facilitate the creation of new works, rather than merely displaying objects. On that end, the program participants will be able to use the interactive table (a large-format multi-touch screen allowing direct collaborative work for smaller groups of people) and tablets (for individual input to any collective task).

Detailed View of the Interactive Table with Multi-Touch functionality • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects

The Cabinet’s goal is to maximize the visitors' attention by involving them in participatory learning and discovery through their own creative experience and play. For that reason, the Cabinet's design and content distribution is geared toward offering an opportunity to explore. The mere action of opening drawers without knowing beforehand what will be found inside might serve as the surprise-triggering moment piquing one's interest and imagination.

3D Simulation with Digital Components • © 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects
Created By
Michaela Sidenberg
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© 2017 Jewish Museum in Prague / Marek Topic Architects

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