Children Emily Wood

Children

Children were considered to be miniature versions of adults. There was no teenage years back then, you were either viewed as a child or as an adult.

Sir Walter Ralegh; Walter Ralegh by Unknown artist. Fine Art. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/114_942241/1/114_942241/cite. Accessed 16 Mar 2017.

Raising the children

A nurse in the nursery is where children spent most of their time. They spent so much time in the nursery because their elders did not want to be disturbed.

Infant Mortality

The infant mortality rate in Elizabethan England was approximately 33%. Dysentery, scarlet fever, whooping cough, influenza, smallpox, pneumonia, accidents were the most common causes of infant mortality. Families didn’t react strongly about the death because it tended to happen multiple times.

Children's behavior

They were expected to be obedient and respectful. The punishment for misbehavior was getting whipped or beat.

Punishment at school in the Tudor Age (gouache on paper). Photograph. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/108_1095131/1/108_1095131/cite. Accessed 13 Mar 2017.

Education For Children

Girls attended school in Catholic convents, typically as residents but sometimes as day students. Wealthy parents sent their sons to secular boarding schools, prestigious and typically expensive institutions that taught a wide variety of subjects. The subjects include math, composition, geography, history, Latin, Greek, french, German, and fencing. Royal children always had tutors (Netzley 38-39).

ENGLISH SCHOOL, 1577. - A late 16th century English grammar school; note the birching of a boy at the left: woodcut from Holinshead's "Chronicle," 1577.. Fine Art. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/140_1657943/1/140_1657943/cite. Accessed 13 Mar 2017.

Video

Works Cited

  1. Grendler, Paul F. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance. New York: Scribner's, 1999. Print
  2. Jones, Madeline. Growing up in Stuart times. London: B.T. Batsford, 1979. Print.
  3. Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare, by William Baker and Kenneth Womack, vol. 1, Facts on File, 2012, pp. 24-45. Facts On File Library of World Literature. Gale Virtual Reference Library, go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=nysl_ca_queen&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CCX2025400014&it=r&asid=c87445b884972c236c27fad35e6c08ba. Accessed 13 Mar. 2017.
  4. Lynda Payne, "Health in England (16th–18th c.)," in Children and Youth in History, Item #166, http://chnm.gmu.edu/cyh/primary-sources/166 (accessed March 13, 2017).
  5. Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare, by William Baker and Kenneth Womack, vol. 1, Facts on File, 2012, pp. 24-45. Facts On File Library of World Literature. Gale Virtual Reference Library, go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=nysl_ca_queen&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CCX2025400014&it=r&asid=c87445b884972c236c27fad35e6c08ba. Accessed 13 Mar. 2017.
  6. Netzley, Patricia D. Life during the Renaissance. San Diego, CA: Lucent, 1998. Print

Video citation: Elizabethan England. N.p., 04 Oct. 2014. Web. 04 Oct. 2014. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqhZsKQo__s>.

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