Christmas Prep - Waiting Christmas and the art of patience

by Glen Pearson

Even the original Christmas story contained heavy doses of waiting, patience, and eventual reward. Scholars say it would have taken the Wisemen over a year to get to Bethlehem. The shepherds were just doing their usual thing - waiting and watching their flocks on a quiet night. And the greatest narrative of all concerned how Mary, a pregnant young woman away from home, patiently endured an arduous journey until she finally gave birth to her child is less than preferred circumstances.

The most valuable things in life aren't only worth the wait, they can only be acquired and refined through patience. If they weren't precious, they wouldn't be worth the focus in our lives. Voltaire used to say, "We never live; we are always in the expectation of living." It's true. We live by our dreams and not just by all those things we acquire.

We are aided in this by the knowledge, weeks in advance, that the Christmas season is coming and that a lot of developments in society around us get geared up for it - store displays, lights, music, gift preparations, holiday foods, Christmas movies, children in anticipation, school breaks. Some find all this hoopla too much, but when approached properly, and in quiet measure, they remind us that our lives have a date with a moment of transcendence. It's different for everybody, but it breaks the routine of our collective daily existence and reminds us that we are part of a large world around us that also waits in expectation.

"We never live; we are always in the expectation of living."

Religious lore reminds us that just one child born in a manger was worth all the patient effort, but in our quickened modern world it can impact so many other things. The memory of lost family members or friends, the urge to give, the essential need for quietness and a bit of time to reflect, the rush of romance, the wonder of children, love for God, the craving for eternity over time, the coming together of community, or just the need to work at being better version of ourselves and hope it sticks - these all take the discipline of waiting.

Just because some of our Christmas dreams don't come true doesn't mean that we ever stop waiting, for it is in the pauses of our life that our intuitions are heightened, our sense of want gives way to our true needs, and that we become aware that the quality of the thing we are waiting for actually speaks to the kind of person we truly are. For the original Christmas story, it was about waiting for a new light and presence in the world; for us, it will inevitably involve the transcendent arrival of the better angels of our nature.

Created By
Glen Pearson
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