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Global Citizenship Collaboratory 2018 Webster University, May 21-22

Welcome to the Eighth Annual Collaboratory

Faculty, students, and academic partners are invited to the Global Citizenship Collaboratory, May 21-22. The Collaboratory provides a space for the Webster community to share research, collaborate across disciplines, strengthen assessment practices, and explore new directions related to teaching and learning.

This year’s Collaboratory theme, “Making Every Course Excellent: Developing Skills to Support Lifelong Success” invites the Webster community to consider the intersections between skills instruction, engaging technologies, student motivation, and continuous improvement.

Schedule at a Glance

Monday, May 21

8:30-9:00: Check-in/Coffee

9:00-9:30: Opening Remarks from GCP Director, “We did it ourselves!” — Designing for Impact, Care, and Equity

9:30-10:00: HLC Criteria and Strengthening Webster: What’s Next?

10:00-10:15: Break

10:15-11:30: Supporting Course Excellence: Developments in Resources for Learning and Engagement (Streamed)

11:30-12:00: Skills for Lifelong Success: Graduating Students’ Perspectives (Student Panel)

12:00-1:15: Lunch

12:00-1:15: Summer Advising Team—Group Lunch

1:15-2:30: CONCURRENT SESSIONS A

  1. Keystone Vantage: Student Skills Development
  2. Critical Thinking in Today’s Media Landscape

2:30-2:45: Break

2:45-4:00: CONCURRENT SESSIONS B

  1. How to Design for Creativity in Learning (and Why Now is the Time to Do It)
  2. Verify It for Yourself: Incorporating an Interactive Data Experience into Your Class
Tuesday, May 22

8:00-9:15: EARLY CONCURRENT SESSIONS C (Streamed)

  1. Student Motivation and Equity: How Do We Both Challenge and Support Our Students?
  2. Free Resources to Teach GCP Skills and Content

8:30-9:30: Check-in/Coffee

9:30-10:45: CONCURRENT SESSIONS D

  1. Yes, You Can Integrate Critical Thinking Skills into Your Course Content!
  2. Planning Pays Off: Components of an Effective Assessment Plan

10:45-11:00: Break

11:00-12:15: What We Know, What We Know We Don’t Know: Lessons Learned from Five Years of Assessment

12:15-1:30: Lunch

1:30-2:45: CONCURRENT SESSIONS E

  1. How to Calm Students’ Fears of Public Speaking
  2. Good Stewardship: Optimizing GCP Offerings for Your Department or Program
  3. Free Resources to Teach GCP Skills and Content

2:45-3:00: Break

3:00-4:15: CONCURRENT SESSIONS F

  1. What’s Hard About Teaching the Soft Skills: The Case of Intercultural Competence
  2. Strategies for Supporting Student Writing in the GCP
  3. Student Motivation and Equity: How Do We Both Challenge and Support Our Students?

4:15-5:30: Closing Reception

all Events in East Academic Building and Browning Auditorium

Register now, or keep scrolling to learn more about this event.

Making Every Course Excellent: Developing Skills to Support Lifelong Success

This year’s Collaboratory theme invites the Webster community to consider the intersections between skills instruction, engaging technologies, student motivation, and continuous improvement.

Attendees will have the opportunity to learn more about the following:

  • How do we ensure that all learners have opportunities to build practical skills that matter to them and to their future employers?
  • How can engaged learning techniques and exciting technologies enhance our teaching and learning of Global Citizenship Program skills—written communication, oral communication, critical thinking, intercultural competence, ethical reasoning, and quantitative literacy?
  • How might we assess student learning of GCP skills moving forward?
  • What technologies and supports within our Webster network enhance engaged learning and student motivation?

Schedule Details AND SESSION DESCRIPTIONs

Monday, May 21

Morning events held in Browning Auditorium (BH 160), afternoon events in East Academic Building.

8:30-9:00: Check-in/Coffee
9:00-9:30: Opening Remarks, “We did it ourselves!” — Designing for Impact, Care, and Equity

Bruce Umbaugh, Director, Global Citizenship Program

How do we give all students the educational experiences we promise them without imposing undue burdens? The Tao Te Ching says that the best ruler is barely known by the people and that when things are accomplished, the people therefore say, “we did it ourselves!” This presentation will review our promises to students and some of the barriers to delivering on them. It will suggest ways to do the most for our students — equitably — without the curriculum feeling like an impediment.

9:30-10:00: HLC Criteria and Strengthening Webster: What’s Next?

Nancy Hellerud, Vice Provost

Our HLC Comprehensive Evaluation Visit is over, but we learned much during the preparation and the visit that we can put to good use as we work to strengthen Webster academically and financially. Examples include regular program review (Core Component 4.A.1), using data on student retention and completion to make improvements (4.C.3), and processes for systematic planning and improvement (5.C and 5.D). These activities, and others, fit with our strategic plan and with the goals of the initiatives that will be part of the steering committee work to contain cost, increase efficiencies, and generate revenue. Finally, under HLC’s Open Pathway’s 10-year cycle, institutions now have an Assurance Review four years after a comprehensive evaluation. And 2022 is not that far away!

10:00-10:15: Break
10:15-11:30: Supporting Course Excellence: Developments in Resources for Learning and Engagement (Streamed)

Carla Colletti, Associate Professor, Dept. of Music

Marissa Cope, Assessment & Accreditation Analyst, Office of Institutional Effectiveness

Erica Ellard, Director, Academic Resource Center

Paul Frazier, Lecturer, Math & Computer Science Dept.

Erik Palmore, Director, Faculty Development Center

Webster University has made several new and continuing investments that support the creation of excellent learning experiences. In this session, we will review the current and future status of various initiatives, many centered around new technologies, that enhance quality learning, teaching efficacy, and student success. Our hope is that attendees will come away with the most up-to-date information about key resources for course excellence that they can use as they prepare for their teaching in the coming weeks and months.

11:30-12:00: Skills for Lifelong Success: Graduating Students’ Perspectives (Student Panel)

Webster University students have a wealth of opportunities, both in and out of the classroom, to acquire skills for lifelong success. Three students who recently graduated will share their perspectives on the components of their Webster experience that fostered their abilities to develop and enhance the skills needed to find employment or be accepted to graduate school.

12:00-1:15: Lunch
12:00-1:15: Summer Advising Team—Group Lunch

1:15-2:30: CONCURRENT SESSIONS A

1. Keystone Vantage: Student Skills Development

Kit Jenkins, Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Communications & Journalism

Scott Jensen, Professor, Dept. of Communications & Journalism

Dorcas McLaughlin, Professor, Dept. of Nursing

Nick Tamarkin, Instructor, School of Education

Michael Williams, Keystone Instructor

Using a panel discussion format, Keystone Seminar instructors will share their insights regarding how students employ the skills of the GCP in this culminating course. Data from the Keystone Seminars will be reviewed to discuss trends and patterns in student skill performance with potential implications for future practice across the GCP being posed.

2. Critical Thinking in Today’s Media Landscape

Julie Smith, Visiting Instructor, Dept. of Communications & Journalism

In today’s media landscape, misinformation travels at the speed of light. What are some tools we can use to help determine if information is valid, meaningful, or true? Come learn the latest research on why we share what we do, along with specific tools you can use to augment your own internal lie detectors.

2:30-2:45: Break

2:45-4:00: CONCURRENT SESSIONS B

1. How to Design for Creativity in Learning (and Why Now is the Time to Do It)

Jill Gray, Senior Customer Success Manager, Adobe Education

Erik Palmore, Director, Faculty Development Center

Creativity in learning asks students to redefine problems, develop innovative responses, and take action – essential and desired skills in a highly automated and complex future. Join representatives from the Adobe Education Team to learn more about research behind creativity for problem-solving, and strategies for designing experiences that encourage student creativity, including tools for teaching, assessing, and supporting student learning through creative activities. We will discuss teaching and learning resources uniquely available to Webster via our partnership with Adobe, such as universally available software, training and professional development, and more.

2. Verify It for Yourself: Incorporating an Interactive Data Experience into Your Class

John Aleshunas, Professor, Math & Computer Science Dept.

Complex topics, like climate change policy, can often be better understood when students get experience with the underlying information and data supporting the policy. Practical exercises help students understand policy concepts and the reasons why these policies become politically complex. This presentation will demonstrate how experiential learning exercises can enhance student understanding of topics like climate change policy. It includes example exercises using free open-source tools that can facilitate analysis and visualization and data freely available from reliable Internet sources. These tools and data provide an environment where students can easily conduct experiments and analysis using pre-prepared scripts, allowing them to discover for themselves the complexities behind policy issues. This methodology can increase the understanding and impact of course content.

TUESDAY, MAY 22

8:00-9:15: EARLY CONCURRENT SESSIONS C (Streamed)

1. Student Motivation and Equity: How Do We Both Challenge and Support Our Students?

Carla Colletti, Associate Professor, Dept. of Music

Liza Dister, Coordinator, Faculty Development Center

How do we negotiate the tension between challenging our students to offer their best and supporting student needs so that all have opportunities for success? This session draws on the collective knowledge of the Reflective Teaching Community to explore how issues of equity intersect with issues of student engagement and motivation. Students’ success in higher education is largely based on their ability to navigate the unwritten rules of the system, advocate for themselves, meet challenges independently, and locate appropriate resources. This session explores ways that instructors and staff take on guiding roles, helping students navigate the system and its challenges, while also helping develop student agency and self-efficacy to solve problems and direct their own learning. Participants will collaborate to generate strategies for challenging students in a way that supports motivation and agency, and will leave with personal goals to take action on supporting our students as lifelong learners.

2. Free Resources to Teach GCP Skills and Content

Holly Hubenschmidt, Head of Instruction & Liaison Services

Beth Price, Resources Management Librarian

Do you want FREE textbooks or readings to support teaching the GCP skills? Not sure where to start? Join us to learn more about identifying and utilizing open educational resources (including complete textbooks), portions of copyrighted materials, and library resources like articles and datasets in your teaching and how the library can help. We will talk about benefits and challenges of open educational resources and help you decide if they are right for you.

8:30-9:30: Check-in/Coffee

9:30-10:45: CONCURRENT SESSIONS D

1. Yes, You Can Integrate Critical Thinking Skills into Your Course Content!

Kristen Anderson, Associate Professor, Dept. of History, Politics, & International Relations

Kathy Gaynor, Information Literacy Librarian & University Archivist

Morgan Grotewiel, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Psychology

Participants in this session will examine assumptions surrounding integrating critical thinking into their teaching, share strategies for teaching and assessing critical thinking, and brainstorm ways to improve or create course assignments to teach and assess critical thinking. After a brief introduction to critical thinking, we will present concrete examples from different disciplines and lead participants in an activity that they can apply to their own classrooms.

2. Planning Pays Off: Components of an Effective Assessment Plan

Marissa Cope, Assessment & Accreditation Analyst, Office of Institutional Effectiveness

Assessment is a process that can be summed up in four words: Plan, Do, Check, and Act. Too often, we do not give each component of this process enough intentional thought before jumping right to the data collection, or “checking” step. However, a solid assessment plan makes the entire process easier and more transparent to everyone involved. The purpose of this session is for attendees to identify steps for being intentional about assessment planning. We will cover the why, what, how, and when factors of assessment planning, including how it applies to GCP assessment, program-level assessment, and specific assessment projects. Participants will work through the components of an assessment plan, and leave with tools specifically for how to develop a plan for assessment of student learning.

10:45-11:00: Break
11:00-12:15: PLENARY ACTIVITY, What We Know, What We Know We Don’t Know: Lessons Learned from Five Years of Assessment

Justin Bitner, Director, Office of Institutional Effectiveness

Julianna Sandholm-Bark, Assistant Professor and Head of Global Citizenship Program, Webster Geneva

Bruce Umbaugh, Director, Global Citizenship Program

This session describes what we have learned from GCP assessment in St. Louis and Geneva, both about student learning and about our practices. It also offers Collaboratory attendees the opportunity to review and discuss fresh assessment data. There are patterns that appear to characterize student learning in GCP courses, and we will review what has been found to date. In addition, GCP assessment has enabled collaboration across departments and across campuses. Participants will gain an understanding of how the GCP’s success is directly tied to the robustness of its assessment plan. They will also have the opportunity to discuss, in light of their own experiences and understanding, how the observations that have been made can inform teaching, course and curriculum design, and making assessment matter.

12:15-1:30: Lunch

1:30-2:45: CONCURRENT SESSIONS E

1. How to Calm Students’ Fears of Public Speaking

Scott Jensen, Professor, Dept. of Communications & Journalism

Julie Setele, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Anthropology & Sociology

In this session, we will discuss the strategies we have used to teach the Oral Communication skill. Julie has effectively used scaffolding to improve her teaching of debates in an Intro Criminology course, and is working to improve her teaching of sequenced presentations in a Social Movements course. Scott has extensive experience teaching oral communication both in the classroom and with the university’s debate team.

2. Good Stewardship: Optimizing GCP Offerings for Your Department or Program

Danielle MacCartney, Associate Professor, Dept. of Anthropology & Sociology

This session will review several strategies to make the most of GCP courses to attract new majors, including having the best teachers teach GCP courses, developing signature experiences, coordinating scheduling of GCP classes to avoid conflicts with other departments, and strategically offering under-represented skill areas.

3. Free Resources to Teach GCP Skills and Content (See EARLY Concurrent Session C2 for description)
2:45-3:00: Break

3:00-4:15: CONCURRENT SESSIONS F

1. What’s Hard About Teaching the Soft Skills: The Case of Intercultural Competence

Emily Thompson, Professor of French and Chair, Dept. of International Languages & Cultures

This session will provide an opportunity for people to share thoughts and experiences about teaching the Intercultural Competence GCP skill. Emily Thompson, Chair of International Languages and Cultures, will guide the discussion and describe challenges that she and her colleagues have confronted when teaching this skill in the many ILC courses that are coded for intercultural competence. How do you integrate “culture” into a curriculum? How do you train students to apply this skill beyond the classroom? How do you assess a skill that seems to rely so heavily on attitudes? Although the soft skills are notoriously resistant to assessment, they also require knowledge and implementation that can be more directly assessed.

2. Strategies for Supporting Student Writing in the GCP

Karla Armbruster, Professor, Dept. of English

This session will cover two strategies that can substantively affect students’ development as writers: 1) motivating and supporting substantive revision and 2) using research-based approaches to issues of style and mechanical correctness. We will explore both the theory and practice of these strategies and discuss how to apply them to help students improve their written communication.

3. Student Motivation and Equity: How Do We Both Challenge and Support Our Students? (SEE EARLY CONCURRENT SESSION C1 for description)
4:15-5:30: Closing Reception

Networking Opportunities

Participants at the Collaboratory have the opportunity to network and collaborate with colleagues across disciplines, departments, and campuses. A contingent of representatives from Webster’s international campuses provides diverse perspectives and insights, and partnerships formed during the Collaboratory help strengthen Webster’s worldwide network.

HANDS-On Sessions

Attendees of the 2018 Collaboratory are invited to participate in engaging sessions about technology and education, teaching and learning, and various pedagogy topics. Check back soon for some of the highlights of this year’s line-up.

Credits:

Photo Credits: Webster University GMC Photo Archive, https://websteru.photoshelter.com/archive

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