Shakespeare's Life elijah Richards Period 4

Thesis: Shakespeare influenced playwrights throughout his early, middle, and late life.

Early Life:

Quote #1: "Beginning at about the age of 7, William probably attended the Stratford grammar school with other boys of his social class. The school’s highly qualified teachers were graduates of Oxford University. Students spent about nine hours a day in school. They attended classes the year around, except for three brief holiday periods."(Lander).

Commentary: Shakespeare was worked hard from an early age. He was also very intelligent, because he was in such a high status school.

Quote #2: "More an observer than a participant in life, only “sweet” by biographer’s mistaking, he is “not benevolent, only acquisitive, insatiably that,” so that “he annexes whatever territories butt on his own.” The artist who absorbs emotion and experience primarily to endow fictional characters with feeling remains aloof, shadowy, and inaccessible. “Shakespeare’s life differs from his art . . . pointing to nothing beyond itself until he dreams it.” When Fraser thinks of comparison with other artists, he thinks of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, “his only peer among artists,” but Mozart’s genius grew out of his nurturing, whereas Shakespeare “realized his genius against the grain.”(Archer).

Commentary: Shakespeare got the feelings of everything and his writings were enhanced by that. From a young a young age Shakespeare was good at writing.

Quote #3: "In 1582 Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway, eight years his senior and pregnant at the time of the marriage. They had three children: Susanna, born in 1583, and twins, Hamnet and Judith, born in 1585. Nothing is known of the period between the birth of the twins and Shakespeare's emergence as a playwright in London (c.1592). However, various suggestions have been made regarding this time, including those that he fled Stratford to avoid prosecution for stealing deer, that he joined a group of traveling players, and that he was a country schoolteacher."("William").

Commentary: Although Shakespeare had twins, he still wrote his plays. Shakespeare was very successful even with some setbacks.

"In 1594, Field printed Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece. The book’s dedication to Southampton suggests a closer acquaintance between the writer and the aristocrat. The volume was not as popular as Venus and Adonis, but it still sold well. Seven editions had been published by 1632. Despite the commercial success of these early publications, Shakespeare made no effort to make a career of poetry. When the theaters reopened, he returned to acting and playwriting."(Lander).

Commentary: Not all of Shakespeare's writings were the most popular. Shakespeare also was not forcing himself to write poetry and make that his career.

Middle Life:

Quote #4: "In 1594, Field printed Shakespeare’s The Rape of Lucrece. The book’s dedication to Southampton suggests a closer acquaintance between the writer and the aristocrat. The volume was not as popular as Venus and Adonis, but it still sold well. Seven editions had been published by 1632. Despite the commercial success of these early publications, Shakespeare made no effort to make a career of poetry. When the theaters reopened, he returned to acting and playwriting."(Lander).

Commentary: Not all of Shakespeare's writings were the most popular. Shakespeare also was not forcing himself to write poetry and make that his career.

Quote #5: "...understand Shakespeare's theater because it influenced how he wrote his plays...took the theater of his time, and he used it brilliantly"(Anderson).

Commentary: Shakespeare also was influenced by his own theater. Shakespeare influenced many people including himself.

Quote #6: "Like Shakespeare's stage, this kind of thrust stage, with its minimal scenery allows playwrights (if they want) to move their stories rapidly from place to place... As a result, playwrights have been tempted to write plays that imitate the style of movies"(Anderson).

Commentary: Shakespeare's stage worked for him so others thought it would work for them. Shakespeare's stage influenced how others wrote and showed their plays.

Quote #7:"Throughout the 1590’s, Shakespeare’s reputation continued to grow. From 1594 to 1608, he was fully involved in the London theater world. In addition to his duties as a sharer and actor in the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, he wrote an average of almost two plays a year for his company. During much of this period, Shakespeare ranked as London’s most popular playwright, based on the number of times his plays were performed and published. But his reputation was largely that of a popular playwright, not of a writer of unequaled genius."(Lander).

Commentary: Shakespeare was very popular in London and the rest of the world. He set the tone for rest of the people that wrote plays at the time.

Late Years:

Quote #8: "During his last eight years, Shakespeare was the sole author of only three plays—Cymbeline,The Tempest, and The Winter’s Tale. He collaborated with John Fletcher, another English dramatist, in writing three more plays. In the past, some scholars argued that The Tempest, written about 1610, was Shakespeare’s last play. Such a theory was encouraged by the presence in the play of passages that sound like a farewell to the stage. However, in 1612 and 1613, Shakespeare worked closely with Fletcher, who replaced him as the chief dramatist for the King’s Men, on Cardenio (now lost), King Henry VIII, and Two Noble Kinsmen. In addition, Shakespeare purchased a house in the Blackfriars district of London in 1613. The evidence thus suggests that Shakespeare gradually reduced his activity in London rather than ending it abruptly."(Lander).

Commentary: He was still very popular in his latest years. Although he was older and dying he was still being successful and creating plays.

Quote #9:

"In 1611, he and others are preoccupied defending their Stratford tithes and other properties in the Court of Chancery against other claimants. Two of Shakespeare's plays were performed at court in Whitehall...Shakespeare died in 1616"(Baker).

Commentary: Shakespeare defended his stratford and still had plays performing. He could inspire some people because of all he did at the same time and dying a few years later.

Quote #10: "For about 150 years after his death no one seemed to doubt that Shakespeare wrote the works attributed to him. However, in the latter part of the 18th cent. questions began to arise as to whether or not the historical William Shakespeare was indeed the author. Since then the issue has continued to be a subject of often heated debate, albeit mainly in academic circles. Those who doubt that Shakespeare wrote the works (sometimes called "anti-Stratfordians") generally assert that the actor from Stratford had a limited education; some have even claimed that he was illiterate. Many of the questioners maintain that such a provincial upstart could not have had the wide-ranging worldly and scholarly knowledge, linguistic skills, and fine sensibilities evinced by the author of the Shakespearean canon. Such qualities, they assert, could only have been possessed by a university-educated gentleman, multilingual, well-traveled, and quite possibly titled. Critics further contend that playwriting was a lowly profession at the time and that the "real" author protected his reputation by using Shakespeare's name as a pseudonym. Over the years, many other arguments, some involving secret codes, some even more abstruse, have been offered to cast doubt on Shakespeare's authorship."("William").

Commentary: Even after Shakespeare's death he was not everything was known. Shakespeare was still being thought about a lot even 150 years after his death.

Works Cited:

Anderson, Robert. “William Shakespeare’s Lifee.” Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 776-77.

Archer, Stanley. “Young Shakespeare.” Magill’s Literary Annual 1989. Ed. Frank N. Magill. Hackensack: Salem, 1989. n. pag. Salem Online. Web. 30 Nov. 2016. <http://online.salempress.com>.

Baker, William. William Shakespeare. London: Continuum, 2009. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 9 Dec. 2016.

Lander, Jesse M. “Shakespeare, William.” World Book Advanced. World Book, 2016. Web. 17 Nov. 2016.

“William Shakespeare.” Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6Th Edition (2016): 1-4. History Reference Center. Web. 18 Nov. 2016.Vancouver/ICMJE

Credits:

Created with images by tonynetone - "William Shakespeare" • WikiImages - "shakespeare poet writer" • ryanrocketship - "Lego Shakespeare" • Biblioteca Rector Machado y Nuñez - ""Shakespeare"" • WikiImages - "william shakespeare poet writer"

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