AVID Documentation Interactive Notebooks in the Science classroom

AVID Interactive Notebooks (INB) in the Science classroom have evolved over the course of the year from students entering EVERYTHING into it, in order of course, to a more in-depth, richer study of science. This has taken shape as students have become more accustomed to taking and using Cornell Notes and revisiting them along the way. What began as a struggle for many students to record "Teacher and Class Notes" on the right side (input) and student products (output) on the left side has become more common place. Each student participated in a gallery walk to become familiar with the creation and use of a science journal, viewing example covers and interiors from various actual scientists, including geologists, biologists and botanists. Students noted layouts, notations, illustrations, and the use of color to enhance the authors thoughts.

The Earth and Precipitation as presented by "Brooke".
Atoms and the Periodic Table as learned during 3rd quarter.
Atoms, the Periodic Table and, yes, Ecosystems during 3-4th quarter.

Each student creates their own cover artwork that reflects topics covered in the science classroom that semester. Students begin the interior by adding in a Table of Contents, Scoring Rubric, INB Score Sheet and an Adult Input Page. Students begin with their entries with a lesson taking and using Cornell Notes. Students then continue to enter items into their INB Table of Contents with each new item presented to them in class. Students are numbering pages even when cutting and pasting an item that may enter over it on the page.

An example of left-side, right-side INB Table of Contents entries and a Scoring Rubric
INB Table of Contents, Cornell Notes and the "Curve of Forgetting".

Some Special Education and English Language Learner students are utilizing fillable Cornell Notes to build vocabulary skills. All students create fold-ables and Word Plaques to learn science vocabulary. Students are posting Word Plaques for each unit throughout the classroom to remind them to pronounce and use current topical vocabulary. Students use vocabulary creation to research and critically read science articles in order to prepare student-led discussions that use vocabulary to help them present arguments during classroom debates and lessons. Students revisit Cornell Notes as warm-ups to classroom activities to add questions, thoughts and diagrams and to write summaries and questions in an effort to increase the recall of materials as indicated by the Curve of Learning.

An example of one of many fillable Cornell Notes shared as a PDF via either Google Docs or DocHub.
An example of both a WORD Plaque (left) and Vocabulary Fold-able (right)
An example of both a WORD Plaque (left) and Vocabulary Fold-able (right)
Front side of a research assignment that leads to a classroom discussion requiring students to take a side of an issue.
Back side of a research assignment that leads to a classroom discussion requiring students to take a side of an issue, yet requiring them to write questions and summarize the material.

As students enter items into their notebooks, they begin to not only enter teacher input but also add to their production page. Occasionally students may need to add additional pages for additional output, or products, such as graphs and analysis responses. Classroom expectations when this happens is to either create a fold-able for the item needing a second page, or to add it to the very next available page, using the SAME page number so all students will have the same page numbers representing the same products. That way, all students will all be able to reference each document easily as they revisit items during warm-ups or for reference for assessment preparation.

Right-hand, left-hand page documentation with summaries and questions in the margins.
Right-hand, left-hand examples of a laboratory experiment. Left-hand page is a foldable, with student analysis/responses underneath the graph.
Right-hand, left-hand examples of a laboratory experiment. Left-hand page is a foldable, with student analysis/responses underneath the graph.

At the end of each lesson, typically 6-8 pages of effort, student INB's are scored for content and organization and provided feedback in an effort to help them improve their INB entries. At that time, students also return INB's with an Adult Input signature, showing they have taught their parent/guardian a brief lesson covering a current topic. Feedback on student INB's includes: notes on their reflections, comments on Adult Input topics, left side/right side confusion, missing assignments, completion of Table of Contents, and whether or not their content processing supports content learning. Student assignments are either fully scored or stamped for completion, based on the depth of the work and the nature of the assignment to indicate the importance of the assignments and as to whether a Summative (80%) or Formative Assessment (20%).

Student scores based upon work completion and organization of their INB (left side)
Student scores based upon work completion and organization of their INB (left side) as well as the Adult Input with comments as to what topic the adult was taught.
Created By
Bruce Carvalho
Appreciate

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