Crayon Crayon Rock By Aly Daniels

  • Title: The Crayon Box that Talked
  • Author: Shane DeRolf
  • Illustrator: Michael Letzig
  • Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
  • ISBN: 978-0679886112
  • Number of Pages: 32
  • Genre: Multicultural, Fiction, Picture Book
  • Summary: A little girl overhears some crayons whining because they do not like one another. The little girl decides to buy the crayon box and take it home to draw a picture. The little girl uses each crayon individually to create a portion of a drawing. Once the girl finishes her drawing the crayons all see what a beautiful picture they have created together. They all end up being happy and getting along after that because they see the beauty that happens when everyone works together.
  • Reading Component: Comprehension
  • Standard: W.2.1 – Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section.
  • Area of Language Arts: Writing
  • Objective: By the end of the lesson, students will be able to compose an opinion piece stating which crayon is the best supplying two reasons and using at least two linking words.
  • Explanation: The book The Crayon Box that Talked will address comprehension because the students will need to comprehend what they read in order to be able to effectively write a persuasive opinion piece. The standard is to write an opinion piece because students should be able to develop an opinion about which color they like the best fairly easily. The area of language arts is writing because the objective is to have the students compose an opinion piece using two reasons and at least two linking words. The story lends itself nicely to many objectives and standards, however, this is one that I thought would be enjoyable for the students.

Additional Source:

  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5A0AQs3SCI
  • This is a reading of the book online
  • http://www.kinderart.com/multic/mlkjr_crayons.shtml
  • This is a multicultural lesson plan that goes along with the book.
  • Author: Patricia Hubbard
  • Illustrator: G. Brian Karas
  • Publisher: Square Fish
  • ISBN: 978-0805061505
  • Number of Pages: 32
  • Genre: Children's Fiction
  • Summary: This book is about a little girl who says that her crayons talk. As she draws with each color she says each crayon has something to say. Purple shouts, brown sings, blue calls, yellow chirps, gold brags, silver toots, red roars, green yells, etc.
  • Reading Component: Fluency
  • Standard:RL.2.4 – Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song
  • Area of Language Arts: Speaking
  • Objective: By the end of the lesson, students will be able to identify the rhyming words and their pattern, and discuss how rhymes add meaning to the story by constructing two to three sentences.
  • Explanation: The story My Crayons Talk is a great story for fluency because it has a nice rhythm, repetition, and sense of rhyme. The standard and objective helps the students to focus on the rhyming and rhythm of the story, which will help to focus their attention on the rhythm and being able to read the story fluently. The students will discuss in groups, and write down their thoughts about the rhythm of the story.
  • Additional Resources: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8lA67PRgVlU This is an audio reading of the story. It sounds almost like a song.
  • Another lesson plan idea for the book http://notjustcute.com/2010/01/20/book-activity-my-crayons-talk/
  • Author: Crockett Johnson
  • Illustrator: Crockett Johnson
  • Publisher: HarperCollins
  • ISBN: 978-0064430227
  • Number of Pages: 64
  • Genre: Children's Fiction (Picture Book)
  • Summary: A four year old boy named Harold, takes a walk using his purple crayon to create everything he encounters on the way. Harold draws a forest, a dragon, an ocean, sailboat and many other images to create an adventure. At then end, Harold draws his own window and his bedroom and his bed and he goes to sleep after a long night of adventuring.
  • Reading Component: Comprehension
  • Standard: – RL.2.7 –Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.
  • Area of Language Arts: Viewing
  • Objective: By the end of the lesson, students will be able to depict the characters, setting, and plot of the story using the information gained solely from the illustrations.
  • Explanation: The book Harold and the Purple Crayon is effective for focusing on the illustrations. The illustrations can be the sole focus because Harold is the one who is creating the scene throughout the majority of the book. The standard is using illustrations to demonstrate an understanding of characters, setting, or plot. The students will focus on the illustrations for this objective and they will need to depict the characters, setting, and plot through pictures and a sentence or two describing their pictures.
  • Additional Resources:
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVaOOgWyvJM Audio reading of the book.
  • http://k6educators.about.com/od/uppergradelessons46/a/Harold-And-The-Purple-Crayon-Lesson-Plan.htm A different language arts lesson plan for fourth graders using Harold and the Purple Crayon.
  • Author: Robin Nelson
  • Illustrator: N/A
  • Publisher: Lerner Classroom
  • ISBN: 978-1467707985
  • Number of Pages: 24
  • Genre: Nonfiction, Informational Text
  • Summary: The book goes through all of the steps to make a crayon. It begins with clear wax being melted. Once it's melted, color is added and then it is added to a crayon mold. Once the mold cools, it is removed, wrapped in paper and sorted into sets to be sold in stores.
  • Reading Component: Vocabulary
  • Standard: L.2.4e – Use glossaries and beginning dictionaries, both print and digital, to determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases.
  • Area of Language Arts: Critical Thinking
  • Objective: By the end of the lesson, students will be able to use the glossary to determine the meaning of ten words they did not recognize.
  • Explanation: The book is a look inside of how crayons are made. This is a good book to focus on vocabulary with because there will be technical terms and items that the students have probably never encountered before. The students will have to use critical thinking to decipher the words, and think through the definitions of a variety of words.
  • Additional Resources: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzVE7KY40D4 This is a video of a child reading the book From Wax to Crayon
  • http://www.greatschools.org/gk/worksheets/glossary-2/ Worksheets to help students learn how to use a glossary and gain some practice using them.
  • Author: Lisa M. Guidone
  • Illustrator: N/A
  • Publisher: Gareth Stevens Publishing
  • ISBN: 978-0836893724
  • Number of Pages: 24
  • Genre: Nonfiction, Children's Informational Text
  • Summary: This book is another look into the crayon making process. This book is an in depth look at how crayons are made, and also talks about the different people who work in the crayon factory.
  • Reading Component: Comprehension
  • Standard: RI.2.1 – Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • Area of Language Arts: Speaking
  • Objective: By the end of the lesson, students will be able to construct the answer to the questions who, what, where, and how about the book What Happens at a Crayon Factory using complete sentences and accurate grammar for each answer.
  • Explanation: The book What Happens at a Crayon Factory? takes a look inside a crayon factory and discusses how crayons are made. The reading component comprehension is being addressed in the standard because the lesson I was planning would focus on answering questions that help the students to understand the key details of the book. The area of language arts that the lesson will focus on is speaking because the students will answer these questions orally, as well as write the answers in complete sentences.
  • Additional Resources:
  • http://www.crayola.com/about-us/colorful-careers.aspx This website discusses some careers of individuals at Crayola.
  • http://www.sandbox-learning.com/Default.asp?Page=181 This website provides activities to teach children how to ask and answer questions.
  • Author: Lee Slater
  • Illustrator: N/A
  • Publisher: Checkerboard
  • ISBN: 978-1624039768
  • Number of Pages: 32
  • Genre: Nonfiction, Biography
  • Summary: The book is a look into the creators of Crayola. The two cousins are Edward Binney and C. Harold Smith. The book follows their story from their childhood. The book then discusses their early work at Edwin's father's Peekskill Chemical Works. Then the book ends talking about the company's evolution into the Binney and Smith Company.
  • Reading Component: Reading Comprehension
  • Standard: W.2.7 – Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).
  • Area of Language Arts: Writing
  • Objective: By the end of the lesson, students will be able to create a research project over the creators of the Crayola company, that explains their life, using this book and others from the text set.
  • Explanation: The book, Crayola Creators is a great book to learn the history of the men who created the Crayola Company. This book can be used as one book to get the students started on a research project about the Crayola Company, or its founders. The area of language arts that is being focused on is writing because that is how the students will share the information that they collected from the book. The reading component is reading comprehension because the students need to comprehend what they read in order to formulate a research project that meets the criteria and shares valuable information.
  • Additional Resources:
  • http://americacomesalive.com/2013/12/12/inventors-crayons-binney-smith/
  • This can be an additional website that the students use to gather information about the Crayola founders.
  • Web site: https://ourhomeworkhelp.wordpress.com/2016/07/12/color-wheel-chart/
  • Citation: Ourhomeworkhelper, B. (2016). Color Wheel Chart. Retrieved November 24, 2016, from https://ourhomeworkhelp.wordpress.com/2016/07/12/color-wheel-chart/
  • Summary: The color wheel is a tool that can be used to select coordinating color schemes. There are primary colors which are red, yellow, and blue. These colors are the basis for every color. When you mix two of the primary colors you get secondary colors such as orange, green and purple. There are also tertiary colors which appear when you mix two secondary colors together. Some examples of tertiary colors are red-orange and blue-green.
  • Reading Component: Vocabulary
  • Standard: RF.2.3d – Decode words with common prefixes and suffixes.
  • Area of Language Arts: Critical Thinking
  • Objective: The students will decode the words tertiary, primary, and secondary using common prefixes and suffixes to determine their definition and how it relates to the color wheel.
  • Explanation: The color wheel helps to deepen the understanding of colors and how crayons can apply to our everyday life. The standard being addressed is about prefixes and suffixes which the students will use to understand the different words on the color wheel. Understanding the definition of the words on the chart will help the chart to make sense and add relevance to it. The reading component being addressed is vocabulary and the area of language arts is critical thinking because the students will be decoding the words using prefixes and suffixes to discover their meaning.
  • Additional Resources:
  • https://www.sessions.edu/color-calculator/
  • This is a color calculator and it gives the students an interactive chart of the color wheel.
  • http://www.tigercolor.com/color-lab/color-theory/color-theory-intro.htm
  • This is a website that gives the basics to color theory.
  • Web Site: • http://www.crayola.com/about-us/company.aspx
  • Citation: Company. Retrieved November 24, 2016, from http://www.crayola.com/about-us/company.aspx
  • Summary: The website discusses how Crayola has been able to provide artistic creativity for over 100 years. Crayola began in 1903 by two cousins Edwin Binney and C. Harold Smith. Crayola produced the first box of eight crayons and sold them for five cents. In 1984 Crayola became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Hallmark Cards. The company kept the name of its founder until 2007 when it changed its name to Crayola because that was the number one brand of the company.
  • Reading Component: Comprehension
  • Standard: RI.2.2 – Identify the main topic of a multi-paragraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.
  • Area of Language Arts: Visually Representing
  • Objective: By the end of the lesson, students will be able to identify the main topic of a multi-paragraph text and create a visual representation of it that receives a rubric score of seven out of nine.
  • Explanation: This is the Crayola website. For this objective, I decided to focus on how the company began. There is a multi-paragraph article that discusses how the company began and it lends itself perfectly to the standard about identifying the main topic of a multi-paragraph article. This addresses the reading component of comprehension because identifying the main idea is a key comprehension strategy. This objective also addresses the visual representation portion of language arts because for the lesson I am going to have the students visually represent the main idea instead of just writing it.
  • Additional Resources:
  • http://www.smekenseducation.com/Helping-Students-Identify-the-M.html
  • This website provides tips on how to help students identify the main idea.
  • https://educators.brainpop.com/bp-jr-topic/main-idea/
  • This is a website that has different Brain Pops to help students with the main idea
  • Web site: http://materialicious.com/2012/08/artwork-made-with-thousands-of-crayons.html
  • Citation:Artwork Made With Thousands of Crayons. Retrieved November 24, 2016, from http://materialicious.com/2012/08/artwork-made-with-thousands-of-crayons.html
  • Summary: This is artwork created by Christian Faur. Christian stacks tens of thousands of crayons on top of each other to create beautiful masterpieces. The sharpened tips become the dots that you see, which makes the picture look pixilated.
  • Reading Component: Comprehension
  • Standard: L.2.1e – Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified.
  • Area of Language Arts: Writing
  • Objective: By the end of the lesson, students will be able to create a paragraph using at least six different adjectives to describe a picture created by Christian Faur.
  • Explanation: These pictures created by Christian Faur are unique and created entirely of crayons. The beauty of these pictures lends itself to addressing the standard of using adjectives to describe an object. The reading component being addressed is comprehension because the students need to comprehend what is occurring in order to be able to clearly describe the image. The language arts area being addressed is writing because the students will be composing a paragraph to describe the picture using at least six different adjectives.
  • Additional Resources:
  • http://www.christianfaur.com/
  • This is Christian Faur's website, it contains more of his pictures that the students can look at and explore him as an artist.
  • http://lorettabradfield.com/meltedcrayonart-2/
  • This is a different artist named Loretta Bradfield she melts crayons to create art. This can give students just another look at all of the neat and creative ways people use crayons besides coloring.
  • Web site: http://www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/how-its-made/videos/how-its-made-how-crayons-are-made/
  • Citation: Crayons. (2008). Retrieved November 24, 2016, from http://www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/how-its-made/videos/how-its-made-how-crayons-are-made/
  • Summary: Crayons are made from a wax that is easy to melt and is cheap. The wax is melted and a special non toxic powder is added to it. Then coloring is added to make the crayons the desired color. The factory can produce over 100 different types of colors. The wax is then poured into the molds and it cools in a few minutes. The excess wax is removed and recycled to make more crayons. The factory produces 30,000 crayons an hour.
  • Reading Component: Comprehension
  • Standard: RI.2.3 – Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text
  • Area of Language Arts: Visually Representing
  • Objective: By the end of the lesson, students will be able to visually represent and sequence the steps in the crayon creating process with ninety percent accuracy.
  • Explanation: The video describes how the crayons are created. However, the video is brief, which lends itself to being able to be sequenced easily by the students. The reading component being addressed is comprehension. The students must fully comprehend the video in order for them to be able to sequence effectively and accurately. The language arts area being addressed is visual representation. The students will need to visually represent the steps. This will show a greater understanding of how a crayon is created, and will also help the students solidify their knowledge.
  • Additional Resources:
  • https://www.havefunteaching.com/worksheets/reading-worksheets/sequencing-worksheets/
  • This website provides a variety of sequencing worksheets that may be needed in order to get the students comfortable sequencing before they can sequence on their own.
  • http://pbskids.org/rogers/video_crayons.html
  • This is another video that shows how crayons are made if you need more details to challenge some of your more gifted students. They can have to add more steps into their sequencing visual representations.

Rationale: The grade that this text set is suited for is 2nd grade. The main topic of this text set is crayons. When I created the text set I intended it to be for any student. This text set can be for high achievers, low achievers, creative students, or those who are not so creative. What is great about crayons is they are universal, and they are something that everyone enjoys. Everyone loves to color, or enjoys viewing and looking at colors. This is an important topic to study because they are universal, and they can open the door to many projects, and a variety of standards and subjects. In addition, recognizing colors is an important skill. Colors are used to describe a variety of items. It is also important to understand how different colors go together. This can help people with dressing in an appealing way, as well as being able to design and decorate a variety of items.

Citation: PPP: Child growth & development. (2006). Retrieved November 25, 2016, from https://www.extension.purdue.edu/providerparent/child%20growth-development/children%20and%20colors.htm

Made with Adobe Slate

Make your words and images move.

Get Slate

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.