Routes Asia 2017 Full highlights from the first day at routes asia 2017 including the opening ceremony and strategy summit

The day started with the Opening Ceremony from host Okinawa. Key figures from Okinawa's Prefectural Government and Naha airport were joined by Routes brand director Steven Small.

"We hope that Routes Asia will lead to new routes to Okinawa - we endeavour to make Okinawa a world-leading sightseeing destination."

Takeshi Onaga, The governor of Okinawa Prefecture

Our strategy summit brought together high-profile speakers from airlines and airports across Asia to discuss the major issues facing aviation.

ASM's Nigel Mayes hosted the first panel session, titled Airlines - trends, transition and changing models

Taking part were (right to left)...

Ed Sanders, Head of Network & Schedule, Jetstar Airways

Jonathan Hutt, Social Marketing Director, Spring Airlines

Venggatarao Niadu, Head of Network Planning, AirAsia X

Jay L Lingeswara, Deputy Director Commercial, Strategy and Planning, VietJetAir

Sanjiv Kapoor, Chief Strategy and Commercial Officer, Vistara

"The best alliances are those which operate as one brand, offering customers the same service all the way from booking to in-flight. The future of travel in Asia Pacific is going to be owned by brands who can provide this. We are confident that we have built a strong proposition."

Ed Sanders, Head of Network & Schedule, Jetstar Airways

"Indian aviation has grown, but we're about to hit a brick wall unless something is done urgently. You can't add more flights to major cities such as Delhi and Bangalore. That's the elephant in the room."

Sanjiv Kapoor, Chief Strategy and Commercial Officer, Vistara

"Long-haul low cost is absolutely on our radar - but we need to find the right people to work with, whether this is an alliance or another carrier."

Jay L Lingeswara, Deputy Director Commercial, Strategy and Planning, VietJetAir

Our second panel was titled Can airports keep pace with demand? Airport challenges - congestion, capacity and construction

Moderator was Vijay Poonoosamy, Vice President International Affairs, Office of the President & CEO, Etihad Airways (third from right)

Taking part were... (right to left)

Rajeev Jain, CEO, Mumbai International Airport Pvt.

C K Ng, Executive Director, Airport Operations of Airport Authority, Hong Kong

Chin Leong Teo, Director and Head, Traffic Development & Market Analysis, Consultancy, Changi Airports International

Dr. Chikage Miyoshi, Lecturer, Centre for Air Transport Management, Cranfield University

Gregory Jamet, Corporate Executive Vice President CCO-Aeronautical, Kansai Airports

"Planning capacity is a tricky balance. Even if you are winning sometimes you can get too aggressive - there can be a winner's curse."

Chin Leong Teo, Director and Head, Traffic Development & Market Analysis, Consultancy, Changi Airports International

"Many of our facilities in Japan are under-utlilised. We need to consider how we can use this free capacity using privatisation."

Dr. Chikage Miyoshi, Lecturer, Centre for Air Transport Management, Cranfield University

"Designing and planning capacity on a long-term vision that includes flexibility is extremely important. No-one knows what the traffic will be in 20 years."

Gregory Jamet, Corporate Executive Vice President CCO-Aeronautical, Kansai Airports

Then our lightning talks brought together three airlines to tell airports what they really need to hear...

First up was Wilken Bellmann, Head of Network Development Long-Haul, Condor/Thomas Cook Airlines Group:

"Airports and tourism authorities should meet with hoteliers before they meet with us. We want to know there are enough hotel rooms at the right rates."
"We want you to be prepared for the meeting. Don't ask us where we fly, you can find that out before the meeting. And if you don't know your own traffic numbers or how things run - that looks really bad."

Second was Rikke Munk Christensen, Vice President Traffic Planning, Finnair

"An incentive for marketing support can be a deal breaker for long-haul. The £500,000 to £1m in marketing might be small compared to £150m to run a route. But the margins are small - it's about getting anything you can to make you feel comfortable as a business case."
"Some cities can have millions of people, but only 10 per cent of the population has a passport - we need that information."

Finally Seb Mackinnon, Head of Airport Partnerships, Jetstar, took the stage

"With regards to incentives it depends on the destination. There are some destinations where you need significant support, but even then marketing is vital - there is no point creating a route if you're not going to market it. Without marketing support you double the risk."
"The right marketing needs to be a full team effort. We want airports, tourism authorities, local government, developers and hotel associations need to work together."

The day also featured a great start to our exhibition...

And finally, a fantastic day ended with Japanese entertainment and fireworks at our networking evening!

See you tomorrow for day two of Routes Asia 2017!

Made with Adobe Slate

Make your words and images move.

Get Slate

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.