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Social listening J302, lecture 12

WHAT IS SOCIAL LISTENING?

It's a way to know what is being said about your brand (whether that brand is a product, a company, a media organization or an individual). And it's a way to see the public response as it happens.

You can do this on your own (the tough way, by constantly checking all of your social media feeds and doing lots of searches) or you can use social media tools that help you filter out the noise to evaluate the tone, reach and interaction on all of your (or your brand's) social media posts.

Social listening is also about analyzing the data and identifying trends to understand the big picture of how your brand is seen in the world.

As social media expert Joy Mayer says: "As representatives of our brand on social media, we need to be paying attention to monitoring what our audience is saying to us. Anywhere we’re talking to our audience, we need to be listening for what they say back. Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit … we need to always be on top of mentions of our brand."

Photo by dole777 on Unsplash

There are numerous tools you can use to make social listening easier. Some are free and some aren't.

Generally, what those tools do is filter through the various social media to weed out posts not related to your brand and show you only the posts you need to see. So it saves a lot of time to use a social media listening tool.

A couple of free tools you can look at are Hootsuite (below) ...

which will track multiple social platforms, such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram and will also let you schedule posts on multiple sites ...

and TweetDeck (below), which only tracks Twitter, but also lets you filter and schedule. (In these screenshots, you get to see just a few of the many things that I am tracking.)

You should also look at things like the analytics from the individual social media platforms.

Here you get to see my Twitter analytics from April 2020.

and the University Daily Kansan's Facebook Insights from July.

A couple of other tools, seen below, are Keyhole and Mention. And there are many other tools, although many of them have fees for use.

Mention has a free limited-access plan that you could set up for Brief 3. And one benefit of the companies that sell this service is that they will also help you learn about the process.

You can also find more resources on Joy Mayer's website (even though it's directed toward journalists, there are links to tools that will help strat comm majors, too).

Plus the Public Relations Society of America has a link to download an ebooklet on social media listening.

For brief 3 in J302, what you need to do is pick two different social media platforms and look back for at least two months to show how your product/service is branding itself and what the public is saying about it.

ALSO, REMEMBER, YOU NEED TO EVALUATE THE SOCIAL MEDIA, TOO. (FOR BRIEF 3, JUST EVALUATE THE BRAND'S POSTS ITSELF.) USE THE REGULAR CUES, LIKE PUBLISHER, ETC. AND ALSO LOOK AT SOME OF THE EVALUATION FACTORS FEATURED IN AN EARLIER VIDEO THIS SEMESTER ON FAKE NEWS.

J302 VIDEO ON FAKE NEWS AND PROBLEMATIC SOCIAL POSTS

— Gerri Berendzen, J302 Instructor, KU School of Journalism and Mass Communications

Credits:

Title photo: Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash