Adobe Slate a review with cats

Despite Adobe's attempts to optimize for every mobile device, this will not look great on a phone. For instance, the overlay captions have to be kept very short or they get truncated.

The cover photo is optional.
You can choose a theme for your project, which consists of harmonious colors and typefaces. I chose to use the full-screen view for most of the photos because it provides this overlay for the captions.
Because in the full-width view the captions are all in a very small font size.

Click on any of the following photos.

(There is no undo/redo, which makes me feel like this.)

The automatic photo-grid building is nice, but limited to the width of the center column, so you can't get a full-width grid when you rotate to landscape. However, if you tap on any of the photos it enlarges them and lets you swipe through in gallery fashion.

The interface is nearly identical to Adobe Voice. When you add content, it automatically prompts you for the next asset. Alternatively, tapping the plus sign at the bottom of the page shows you what assets you can insert.

Your formatting options are

Heading 1

Heading 2

  • List
  • List
  • List
  1. List
  2. List
  3. List
Or a quotation which stands in a block by itself.

Image options

An inline image.

A full-screen image

With a windowed image, you can choose the area that will dominate the window as it scrolls.

This is a portrait image set to full width, which crops it.

The image picker and the grid view. You can select which images go where.

I hope you like parallax scrolling.

That's the predominant form of movement on these pages.

Your upload options. Basically, you can send to social media or to Adobe's hosting site, slate.adobe.com. Projects can be public or only accessible via a direct link. There's also embed code.

The WYSIWG interface sometimes gets annoying. Things occasionally start moving around as you're entering text.

Rearranging things is also a bit annoying. Like an elevator without floor numbers, you hit the up or down but can't see where you are, so you have to stop, look and decide if you're done moving.

Made with Slate

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