The History of the Microscope An inside look of sciEntist

Anton Van Leewenhoek

The Father of Microbiology
Anton Van Leewenhoek

Birth date:

On October, 24, 1632 Philips Thoniszoon and Grietge Jacob

Place of birth:

He was born in Delft, Zuid-Holland Netherlands

Occupation:

He was a tradesman and scientist.

Contribution to microscope:

Anton Van Leewenhoek contributed different basic ideas to the microscope. Instead of making a complex microscope he made a simple magnifying glass. His design contained one lense places in a tiny hole on a brass plate that makes up the instrument.

Interesting fact:

He is mostly known for the study of microbiology. Anton Van Leewenhoek was the first person to discover and define a single called organism (microorganism). He was also the first to recognize and study muscle fibres, bacteria, etc.

Death date

At the age 90 he died August, 30th, 1723

Citation:

Peter W. Pedrotti,Jr. (2009-2011.) Anton Van Leewenhoek. Retrieved January 16, 2017 from http://www.vanleeuwenhoek.com/

Zacharias Janssen

Sachrias
Left: Hans Janssen his father

Birth date:

His birth date is unknown but it is recorded that in the years 1580-1588 he was born

Place of birth:

He lives in a providence in the Netherlands called Hague in a town called Middleburg

Occupation:

He was a Dutch spectacle (eye glasses) maker

Contributation to Microscope:

Zacharias Janssen is mostly known for his invention of compound lense microscopes. This technique is still used in microscopes scientists use today.

The microscope design consists of three metal tubes that collapse inside each other, with a glass focal point on every end. It seems to have been handheld, and looks more like the telescopes utilized by pirates and mariners than a cutting edge magnifying lens. Magnification was in 3X and 10X, depending whether the tubes were completely extended.

Interesting fact:

He was married twice in his lifetime and was the father of at least one child we know of. Sadly his first wife died. Unfortunately most documents pertaining to his wife were destroyed in a bombing in World War2

Death:

He died in the 1630s

Citation:

Jennie. (March 6, 2013.) Zacharias Janssen and the Invention of the Microscope. Retrieved January 16, 2017 from https://blog.enlightenedlotuswellness.com/2013/03/06/zacharias-janssen-and-the-invention-of-the-microscope/

Robert Hooke

Renaissance Man
Robert Hooke

Birth Date:

He born on July 18, 1635

Place of birth:

Robert Hooke was born in the town of Freshwater, on England’s Isle of Wigh. His parents were John Hooke, who served as curate for the local church parish, and Cecily Hooke.

Occupation:

Professor of Geometry, city surveyor, and scientist

Contribution to Microscope:

In this groundbreaking study, he discovered the term "cell" while experimenting with the structure of a cork. He also described flies, feathers and snowflakes, and correctly identified fossils as evidence of once-living things.

Interesting fact:

Hooke was sickly child. He grew to be a quick learner who was interested in painting and making mechanical toys and models. After his father’s death in 1648, the 13-year-old was sent to London to take up after the painter Peter Lely.

Hooke never married. His niece, Grace Hooke, his longtime live-in companion and housekeeper, as well as his eventual lover

Death:

He died at the age of 67 in London on March 3, 1703

Citation:

biography.com Editors. (December 29, 2015.) Robert Hooke Biography. Retrieved January 16, 2017 from http://www.biography.com/people/robert-hooke-9343172

Credits:

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