Practice planning and problem solving tools - module 5 zap101

INTRO TO TOOLS FOR TOOLS

Introduction to this Module

This module exposes students to the types of ‘artefacts’ we recommend they include in their portfolio’s as ‘evidence’ of achievement, and learning. Our core concern is that students’ complete reflections about their learning experiences, as these demonstrate understanding and application of the course/subject material. However, we also encourage students to upload a range of artefacts with these reflections to further demonstrate that they have achieved the learning outcomes.

For students who are completing ZAP101 you may have seen in module one, that some examples of artefacts include (Hi Sue – funky background for these dot points please):

Planning Tools are bloody important as anything....

Swots 5 WHY's and so much more

Here comes SWOT baby baby

Add content in here!! So blah blah blah

 Electronic files

 Multimedia files, particularly video clips or podcasts

 Images

 Journal entries and blogs

 Career and education documents (e.g. personal profiles, resumes, career and education

plans, student learning plans, personalised business cards)

 Screen shots or links to professional profiles

 Diagrams

Scans of various planning tools and techniques (e.g. business plans, SWOT’s, 5 WHY’s, Mind Maps, Ven Diagrams, PowerPoints)

Portfolio Reflections and Artefacts

What, Why and How?

A key focus of the associate degrees is reflective practice. Students are expected to engage in reflective writing about their experiences, largely through blogging in WordPress, or keeping a journal or diary within their E-Portfolio (or that is uploaded as a file). To enhance reflection, and further demonstrate understanding, students can also create and upload artefacts as evidence.

Reflective portfolios typically including written pieces that enable students to become more familiar with how they learn, but they also tend to include work samples, photographs, and all kinds of evidence. What we recommend for the associate degree program is that students use their WordPress website as a reflective portfolio that additionally showcases achievement – using a range of items, not only written, as evidence.

Even if students prefer to keep hardcopy notebooks, diaries or journals or draw sketches and maps, these can be photographed or scanned and uploaded to WordPress.

In the practice and portfolio subjects in particular, we are looking for evidence of genuine engagement with the course material and the work integrated learning experiences. Such evidence may be in the form of reflections and artefacts that demonstrate your school, work and personal development; and, your understanding of applying discipline theory to practice.

Portfolio Reflections and Artefacts

What, Why and How?

A key focus of the associate degrees is reflective practice. Students are expected to engage in reflective writing about their experiences, largely through blogging in WordPress, or keeping a journal or diary within their E-Portfolio (or that is uploaded as a file). To enhance reflection, and further demonstrate understanding, students can also create and upload artefacts as evidence.

Reflective portfolios typically including written pieces that enable students to become more familiar with how they learn, but they also tend to include work samples, photographs, and all kinds of evidence. What we recommend for the associate degree program is that students use their WordPress website as a reflective portfolio that additionally showcases achievement – using a range of items, not only written, as evidence.

Even if students prefer to keep hardcopy notebooks, diaries or journals or draw sketches and maps, these can be photographed or scanned and uploaded to WordPress.

In the practice and portfolio subjects in particular, we are looking for evidence of genuine engagement with the course material and the work integrated learning experiences. Such evidence may be in the form of reflections and artefacts that demonstrate your school, work and personal development; and, your understanding of applying discipline theory to practice.

Big Problems | 3.45 mins

Text is meant to go in here - break stuff up a bit and remember the narrative

We want to see reflections and evidence about tasks you’ve completed, the skills they helped you to develop, the situations you found challenging and moments of insight – sometimes called critical incidents. Critical incidents are written summaries that reflect on experiences that enhanced learning – these can be positive or negative.

The key concern of the portfolio is for students to become more self-aware and develop critical analysis skills around their own development; so as to identify strengths and weaknesses, and plan accordingly. In addition, it is to help build confidence as students start to see they are learning how to apply theory to practice. Portfolios allow students to reflect back on feelings, thoughts, and entire experiences over the degree.

Swot Baby Swot Swot
Problems and Problems and Problems

Credits:

Created with images by Wokandapix - "lonely hiding sad" • WerbeFabrik - "plan build draw" • DariuszSankowski - "old retro antique" • StartupStockPhotos - "startup start-up notebooks" • jean-louis zimmermann - "SWOT-Analysis-sm" • Photos by Mavis - "problems" • milkisprotein - "Wallpaper for persons having trouble with linux :)" • ccPixs.com - "3D Problem Solving"

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