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May News from Bread and Water for Africa® Kitchen and dining hall for Kenyan students, 3 brothers find love, and more!

This month, we are pleased to report that by the end of the summer, 455 high school age youth in Kenya will no longer have to eat their lunches sitting outside on the ground. Instead, a new dining hall will be constructed with the help of supporters of Bread and Water for Africa®. And also in Kenya, we tell you how Phyllis Keino, founder and director the Lewa Children’s Home takes in the youngest children brought to her under the most dire circumstances. And in Zambia, Angela Miyanda, founder and director the Kabwata Orphanage and Transit Centre prepares those she has taken in under her wing for a life of self-sufficiency when it’s time for them to head out on their own and build a life for themselves.

Kitchen and Dining Hall Coming Soon for Kebeneti Secondary School Students

Any school needs classrooms, a library, and a laboratory. It also needs a kitchen to prepare the food for hungry students, as well as a place for them to gather to sit and enjoy their meal break in between their classwork.

Such as the Kebeneti Secondary School in Kericho, Kenya which has been growing since its founding in 2015. Today, the student population has grown to 455 students, and as their numbers have increased so has the need for a larger kitchen and for an actual cafeteria.

“The dining hall and kitchen are essential as students are currently eating lunch outside,” we were told by school founder Titus Korir.

Through the past few years, thanks to our supporters, especially one in particular, Dick Landis, Bread and Water for Africa® has been able to assist Kebeneti in meeting the educational needs for hundreds of teenage boys and girls who would otherwise been unable to attend a school in their community.

The completion of the dining hall and kitchen by the end of the summer (weather permitting with rainy season ahead) is another step towards Kebeneti’s steady march towards meeting every student’s needs, and that includes a dining hall which “will provide a conducive environment for the students now, and in the long term,” notes Mr. Korir.

Wilson, Samuel and Joseph: Three Abandoned Brothers Find Love in Phyllis’ Arm

For one brief, heartbreaking period in their young lives all that the three brothers Wilson, Samuel and Joseph had was themselves after unbelievably being abandoned by their mother.

And it was on a dark, rainy evening in Kenya when a neighbor heard their desperate crying that a concerned, compassionate neighbor came to their rescue.

Though she tried to locate the boys’ mother, she was nowhere to be found – and with nowhere else to turn, the woman brought Wilson, Samuel and Joseph into the loving, welcoming arms of Phyllis Keino, the founder and director of the Lewa Children’s Home, a longtime partner of Bread and Water for Africa®.

“On arrival, they were weak, hungry and very malnourished,” Phyllis told us. “They came with many ailments.”

In addition, never having been to school, they could neither read nor write and showed signs of being mentally challenged.

Phyllis does not select the orphaned and abandoned children who are brought to her. Whether this is by government officials, the police because their parent(s) are in prison, or caring citizens, she instantly gives them her love as if each is one of her own, because from that moment on they are.

The horrors of their past lives are thankfully unknown, but what is known is that these three boys have a present filled with a love they have likely never known, the basic necessities of life including health care and an education, and hope for a long life and a bright future – thanks to Phyllis and the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa®.

Budding Bakers Get Support in Starting Their Own Cake Business in Zambia

In Zambia, Angela Miyanda takes in the country’s most vulnerable children and provides them with a loving home. But equally important is the fact that in doing so, she also prepares them for the day they will walk out when they must be ready to live on their own – much like when it’s time for a fledgling to leave its mother’s nest.

As she tells us, “The Kabwata Orphanage and Transit Centre was formed to provide basic requirements for orphaned and other vulnerable children in Zambia. Through the provision of education, shelter, health, nutrition, love and security we try to help the children reach their full potential in life.”

Most of the children who came to Kabwata to live 10 or 15 years ago are adults who have completed secondary school and are attending colleges and universities, and Angela justifiably takes pride in their success.

But it is the other young adults, those who are not so strong academically, who worry her. She knows they are capable of becoming self-sufficient with assistance in learning a trade.

Surprisingly, she found that four of her “children” had an interest – and an aptitude – for baking and thanks to the supporters of Bread and Water for Africa® they received the training they needed not just to get a job, but to start their own cake bakery business by assisting them in acquiring the ovens and capital they need to get off the ground.

“This is a project that targets older children who leave Kabwata for reintegration back into society,” explained Angela. “This project believes this gesture to the youth will make a big impact on encouraging even those who have not made it academically.”

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