Multiple Models of Mentorship

Who are the people at your school or work site (or beyond) who bring you strength, energy, passion and hope?

They will be your true mentors.

Broker Mentoring

ROLE

  • Mentor provides orientation to school or work site logistics and culture
  • Mentor brokers involvement of colleagues as needs arise

CONSIDERATIONS

  • Consultant type relationship, fewer opportunities for collaboration and coaching
  • May be initial support until other mentoring relationships are established or ongoing throughout the year
One to One Mentor Matching

ROLE

  • Mentor is site-based and is matched on an individual basis to a new colleague
  • Mentor adopts consultant, collaboration and coaching stances based on the needs of the person they are working with

CONSIDERATIONS

  • Mentoring relationships that flourish are reciprocal – both parties learn and grow
  • Greater “ownership” occurs when the mentor has volunteered and the person being mentored has been involved in the choice of mentor
Group Mentoring

ROLE

  • Mentor works with 2 or more individuals or one individual may have 2 or more mentors
  • Model provide opportunities for collaboration between both new and experienced colleagues

CONSIDERATIONS

  • This model provides flexibility if school or work site has large number of new staff (or mentors)
  • This model is often embedded in a school or site wide “mentoring culture” where all staff are engaged in ongoing collaboration
Informal Mentoring

ROLE

  • Individuals connect with a variety of colleagues as needs arise
  • Mentor/mentee roles are fluid – often referred to as Peer Mentoring as in many cases the informal mentors are relatively new themselves

CONSIDERATIONS

  • Spontaneous, informal nature of relationship lends itself to collaboration
  • Relying on “accident, geography and friendship” may not work for all as new staff could feel isolated if not part of any mentoring relationships
Online Mentoring

ROLE

  • Using online conferencing new staff can participate in discussion and sharing with both experienced and other beginning colleagues

CONSIDERATIONS

  • Enables access to a variety of resources and perspectives outside the school or work site
  • Not everyone may feel comfortable sharing issues and concerns in a “public” online forum
Communities of Practice

ROLE

  • Educators with similar teaching assignments and/or professional interests form learning networks across a region or district
  • These networks may meet face to face and/or online

CONSIDERATIONS

  • Extends the mentoring web beyond school or work site
  • While board level support of these learning networks can be very helpful, it is important that the learning agenda is not externally mandated

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