Brown Girl Dreaming Spark Project By Daniel Schlumberger

The poem that I will be using for my project is Journey on page 29. During the story, Jacqueline's father is talking to the family and telling them that he wants to leave the south and live in the north.

“You can keep your South, my father says.

The way they treated us down there,

I got your mama out as quick as I could.

Brought her right up here to Ohio.

Told her there’s never gonna be a Woodson

that sits in the back of the bus.

Never gonna be a Woodson that has to

Yes sir and No sir white people.

Never gonna be a Woodson made to look down

at the ground.

All you kids are stronger than that, my father says.

All you Woodson kids deserve to be

as good as you already are.

Yes sirree, Bob, my father says.

You can keep your South Carolina.”

In the beginning of the poem, Jacqueline's father is explaining that her mom can live in South Carolina but he will always stay in Ohio. The southerners treated him badly and he brought Jacqueline's mom up to Ohio. He wants to keep Jacqueline and the family safe and not be racially segregated in the south.

“You can keep your South, my father says.

The way they treated us down there,

I got your mama out as quick as I could.

Brought her right up here to Ohio.”

A photo of a street in South Carolina (left) vs. a photo of a street in Chicago Ohio (right).

“Told her there’s never gonna be a Woodson

that sits in the back of the bus.

Never gonna be a Woodson that has to

Yes sir and No sir white people.

Never gonna be a Woodson made to look down

at the ground.”

Towards the middle of the poem, Jacqueline's dad is explaining how his children should not be forced to be segregated in the south, they should be free and live in the North where blacks don't have to sit in the back of the bus or be polite to every white person.

“All you kids are stronger than that, my father says.

All you Woodson kids deserve to be

as good as you already are.

Yes sirree, Bob, my father says.

You can keep your South Carolina.”

Towards the end of the story, Jacqueline's father tells the family how they deserve be stronger, how they should be better and live in the north and not in the south where they aren't the Woodson kids they should be.

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