Was Rapid Industrial Development A Blessing Or A Curse? By : Jack kelly, Hour : 2

The Industry Revolution was started in the US by Samuel Slater brought over blueprints for a factory, then the Cotten Gin was made, it sped up the production of Cotton by 50x Times and then factories were made, to speed up the process even more, then trains were made to have max production rates, and then the economy was booming. That was a blessing, to the south. That was the Industrial Revolution.

Rapid Industrialization was a blessing because, rapid industrialization has had an increase in slaves, lots of factories were being made, and a new forms of transportation was made.

Slavery Increased

Slave trade was increasing due to the new invention of the Cotton Gin. The Cotton Gin increased the production rate of Cotton being cleaned which was 50x Times faster than a slave cleaning Cotton and that made slaves cost a lot more and made the south's economy booming. Slaves prices went up by 5x times, but so did their production rates with the new Cotton Gin. With all the cleaned Cotton they decided to make factories where they have multiple people sewing and making products out of the Cotton. Then the products were sold by train, which was the new form of traveling that was starting to be popular. Overall The slavery increasing and causing the economy to boom was a blessing, it helped form factories, and lead the south to be the #1 producers of Cotten.

Factories Became Relavent

Factories were being made a lot more with the Cotton Gin making production of Cotton 50x faster which made having a factory crucial. The amount of factories was going up a lot with the amount of people learning about the Cotton Gin. Also the factories boosted the economy a lot and people liked working in a factory over working in the fields, yet the factory conditions were rough, but better than the conditions in the fields. So to get a spot working in the factory was a privilege. With all the slaves working in factories they were getting a lot of money with the pure amount of workers who worked there. So then it was if you wanted to get rich then get a factory and a plantation.

Railroads Were Created

New transportation was needed with the amount of Cotton being farmed and cleaned with the new Cotton Gin which lead to very fast production, which needed a new type of transportation, Trains, With there speed and the amount of resources they can hold it was ideal for the time period to transport all the goods to other places in the world who needed such resources such as Cotten, which the south was the main produces of Cotton, with 75% of the worlds Cotton. Then with the act of getting it from one place to another is sped up by trains.

Works Cited

Work Cited

Picture #1

Boston: Phillips speaking against the Fugitive Slave Act. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 2 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/123226. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017.

Picture #2

"Harper’s Weekly”: black slaves working the first cotton gin. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 2 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/181816. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017.

Picture #3

Slavery: slaves on a cotton plantation. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 2 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/14386. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017.

Picture #4

Slavery: slave auction. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 2 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/109672. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017.

Picture #5

Porter, Edwin S.: “The Great Train Robbery”. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 2 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/90179. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017.

Slavery Increase

Appleby, Joyce, Alan Brinkley, Albert S. Broussard, James M. McPherson, and Donald A. Ritchie. Slavery Trade Increased. Bothell, WA: McGraw-Hill Education, 2014. Print.

Factories became relevant

Appleby, Joyce, Alan Brinkley, Albert S. Broussard, James M. McPherson, and Donald A. Ritchie. Factories Increased. Bothell, WA: McGraw-Hill Education, 2014. Print.

Railroads Were Created

Appleby, Joyce, Alan Brinkley, Albert S. Broussard, James M. McPherson, and Donald A. A New Form Of Transportation. Bothell, WA: McGraw-Hill Education, 2014. Print.

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