Argentina Buenos aires

Clothes

You’ll find that most Argentine people tend to dress up a little more than what you might be used to back home. You will see young men wearing jeans and t-shirts or soccer jerseys, but you’ll also see a lot of people in nice pants and dressy shoes. Women tend to wear very feminine clothing, even if they’re wearing jeans, and they don’t tend to wear sneakers. Most people get very dressed up to go out at night, and you will probably want to, as well.

If you want to fit in a little better with your Argentine peers, don’t wear athletic-looking sweat suits or your pajamas. Nice, fitted clothing is what most people wear, and that is a sure way to blend in as best you can. Of course, as with everywhere in the world, you’ll find people who dress differently, maybe more “punk” or more sporty. The main thing that you might want to avoid is dressing like a “typical foreigner,” in baggy jeans and sneakers every day—at least until you get a better idea of how comfortable you are in your new environment and with your new friends.

This information came from Spanishstudies.org

The traditional clothing of Argentina includes gaucho costumes, canvas shoes and woolen ponchos. The gaucho costume is similar to cowboy clothing. Shoes made from canvas are sturdy and made in many colors. Men and women still wear ponchos, which are made in a variety of sizes and colors. Information from Spanish studies.org

Gaucho (Spanish: [ˈɡautʃo]) or gaúcho (Portuguese: [ɡaˈuʃo]) is a word with several meanings. According to the Royal Spanish Academy's authoritative Dictionary, in its historical sense a gaucho was "a mestizo who, in the 18th and 19th centuries, inhabited Argentina, Uruguay and Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil, was a migratory horseman, and adept in cattle work"[1] In Argentina and Uruguay today a gaucho is, according to the same source, simply "A country person, experienced in traditional livestock farming".[2] Because historical gauchos were reputed to be brave, if unruly, the word is also applied metaphorically to mean "Noble, brave and generous",[3] but also "One who is skilful in subtle tricks, crafty".[4] In Portuguese the word gaúcho (note the accent) means "An inhabitant of the plains of Rio Grande do Sul or the pampas of Argentina descended from European man and [Amer]Indian woman who devotes himself to lassoing and raising cattle and horses";[5] and in Brazil gaúcho has also acquired a metonymic signification, meaning anyone, even an urban dweller, who is a citizen of the State of Rio Grande do Sul.[6] In its purest sense, gaucho referred to the nomadic, often outlaw inhabitants of the great plains of Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil. In current usage, gaucho usually designates the rural working class in general."[7] information from Wikipedia

Climate

The bulk of central Argentina, including the Pampas farmland, Cordoba Hills, Mar de Plata and Buenos Aires, enjoys a moderate climate with hot, humid summers and cool, dry winters. January and February -- summer in the Southern Hemisphere -- see temperatures in the high 90s and 100s. Information from google.

United States Of America Weather. Climate: Weather varies widely across the continental USA, as well as in Alaska and Hawaii. In general terms, summers are hot and humid in the plains and southern states, while the southwest is very hot and quite dry. Information from google.

Flag

The blue and white colors were chosen by Manuel Belgrano, the leader of the Argentinian revolution against Spain, and represent the blue sky parting to reveal white clouds, as is said to have happened when the Liberation demonstration began in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on May 25, 1810. Information from Wikipedia

Food

The national dish of Argentina is asados (a variety of barbecued meat) grilled on a parillo (a large grill) that is packed with steaks; ribs; chorizo; mollejas (sweetbread), chinchulines (chitterlings) and morcilla (blood sausage). Information from google.

The “snack” usually consists of a few facturas, which is the name for the wide variety of pastries eaten with a traditional Argentine breakfast. They are more often than not sweet, filled with custards or dulce de leche though you can also find medialunas with ham and cheese filling. Information from google.

Argentina population 2017

During 2017 Argentina population is projected to increased by 457 306 people and reach 44 556 277 in the beginning of 2018. The natural increase is expected to be positive, as the number of births will exceed the number of deaths by 451 132. If external migration will remain on the previous year level, the population will be increased by 6 174 due to the migration reasons. It means that the number of people who move into Argentina (to which they are not native) in order to settle there as permanent residents (immigrants) will prevail over the number of people who leave the country to settle permanently in another country (emigrants).Information from country meters.info

Graph of population

Money in Argentina

In Argentina the kind of money they use is a peso. One American dollar is 16 pesos. Information from Grady.

Government

Gaucho (Spanish: [ˈɡautʃo]) or gaúcho (Portuguese: [ɡaˈuʃo]) is a word with several meanings. According to the Royal Spanish Academy's authoritative Dictionary, in its historical sense a gaucho was "a mestizo who, in the 18th and 19th centuries, inhabited Argentina, Uruguay and Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil, was a migratory horseman, and adept in cattle work"[1] In Argentina and Uruguay today a gaucho is, according to the same source, simply "A country person, experienced in traditional livestock farming".[2] Because historical gauchos were reputed to be brave, if unruly, the word is also applied metaphorically to mean "Noble, brave and generous",[3] but also "One who is skilful in subtle tricks, crafty".[4] In Portuguese the word gaúcho (note the accent) means "An inhabitant of the plains of Rio Grande do Sul or the pampas of Argentina descended from European man and [Amer]Indian woman who devotes himself to lassoing and raising cattle and horses";[5] and in Brazil gaúcho has also acquired a metonymic signification, meaning anyone, even an urban dweller, who is a citizen of the State of Rio Grande do Sul.[6] In its purest sense, gaucho referred to the nomadic, often outlaw inhabitants of the great plains of Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil. In current usage, gaucho usually designates the rural working class in general."[7]President Mauricio Macri has held office since December 10, 2015. As of December 11, 2015, his cabinet consists of the following ministers:[1] information from Wikipedia.

Independence

On July 9, 1816, the independence of the United Provinces of the Río de la Plata was declared (which included modern-day Argentina, Uruguay and part of Bolivia) in a meeting of congress in Tucumán. Information from Wikipedia

Language

In some ways it sounds more like Italian than Spanish. There are also many other languages spoken in Argentina, including Italian, German, English and French. Indigenous languages that are spoken today include Mapuche, Guarani, Aymara, Toba and Quechua. But the official language is Spanish. Information from argentour.com

Dialectal variants of the Spanish language in Argentina. There are at least 40 spoken languages in Argentina. They include indigenous and immigrant languages, with Spanish being dominant. Some are endangered, spoken by elderly people whose descendants do not speak the languages. Information from Wikipedia.

Religion

In Argentina they are 74% catholic, 15% non religious, 8% Protestant, 2% other and 1% Islam. Information from Wikipedia

Argentina on map

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