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lessons From This Year The importance of looking back at old work

If you've been following my work, or if you've read my bio you'd know that last year I was lucky enough to come in first place in the Boston Press Photographers College Sports Contest. As thankful and as happy as I am to have won the award, I cannot stress enough that contests and awards do not make you a good photographer. Is it nice to be recognized for my dedication to my craft? Yes absolutely, but at the end of the day, this is just someone's opinion. The crazy thing about opinions is that they differ among people and cultures and professions. So if you dont win any awards dont take it to hard.

Now that I have that out of the way, it's just about that time for this years Boston Press Photographers awards and tonight is picking night, and that means going through thousands, and thousands of frames from this past year in search of my best work. There's something nice about going through old photographs that tend to give me confidence. I'm not sure if it's because I'm going through my best work, or if its because I've seen how much I've grown, or both.

Photo at Yankee Stadium (2015)

I think it's important to look back on your old work. By re-editing photos from two or three months ago it's easier to see it with a fresh eye, almost as if you were not the photographer who took it. You clearly see the images shortcomings and its faults, but you also see what works and why you liked it in the first place.

Photo of Derek Jeter (2015)

Best of all, by going back and re-editing and re-cropping you can take what you've learned and apply it to these old images. Bringing them a new life and maybe even a new meaning.

This photo is from 2014 (I was 16!) the first photo was my origonal edit and the second one was my latest edit. not much of a change but its much much better then before.

So basically what I'm saying is that you should look back at your old photos and make changes. not just because it's fun, but also because it helps you grow and see your work in a more clear way.

Credits:

Michael Rotiroti

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